Awards Season

January 8, 2010

Feel that excitement in the air. It’s that time again. Get ready for the children’s literature awards. The NAACP Image Award nominees were just announced. Congratulations to everyone who made the list! 

Here are the children’s and teen literature nominees:

Outstanding Literary Work – Children

  • “Child of the Civil Rights Movement” – Paula Young Shelton (Random House Children’s Books)
  • “Negro Speaks of Rivers” – Langston Hughes (Author), E.B. Lewis (Illustrator) (Disney-Jump at the Sun/Disney Book Group)
  • “Our Children Can Soar: A Celebration of Rosa, Barack, and the Pioneers of Change” – Michelle Cook (Bloomsbury Children’s Books)
  • “Peeny Butter Fudge” – Toni Morrison and Slade Morrison (Paula Wiseman Books/Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)
  • “Sugar Plum Ballerinas: Toeshoe Trouble” – Whoopi Goldberg (Disney-Jump at the Sun/Disney Book Group)

Outstanding Literary Work – Youth/Teens

  • “Claudette Colvin: Twice Towards Justice” – Phillip Hoose (Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group/Farrar Straus and Giroux)
  • “Just Another Hero” – Sharon Draper (Atheneum/Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)
  • “Mare’s War” – Tanita S. Davis (Random House Children’s Books)
  • “Michelle Obama: Meet the First Lady” – David Bergen Brophy (Collins-An Imprint of HarperCollins Children’s Books)
  • “Rock and the River” – Kekla Magoon (Aladdin/Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)

Which authors and illustrators of color are on your short list for the kidlit awards? Share your picks in the comments and salute some of the wonderful books published in 2009.

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Super Cheer for Superzero!

January 1, 2010

Happy New Year! Thank you for supporting our site. Today is a special day for one of our own, Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich. Today, her novel, 8th Grade Superzero (Arthur A. Levine, 2010), debuts. Yeah! Woohoo!  Already, it’s winning accolades.

Check out the starred review in Publisher’s Weekly:

“Rhuday-Perkovich delivers a masterful debut, telling a layered middle-school tale filled with characters who are delightfully flawed and, more importantly, striving to overcome those flaws. Reggie McKnight has been saddled with the nickname “Pukey” thanks to a disastrous incident on the first day of school. Attempting to get through the rest of the year unnoticed, he spends his time with his best friends, political activist Ruthie (who shares Reggie’s Jamaican background) and aspiring rapper Joe C. While working on a project at a homeless shelter with his church’s youth group, he becomes increasingly interested and involved in the community, leading to his participation in his school’s presidential race, first as an adviser to a classmate, eventually as a candidate. Rhuday-Perkovich doesn’t take shortcuts, forcing Reggie to deal with a world in which he doesn’t always get the answers or successes he wants, and the book shines as a result. Messages of social justice—whether through church projects, parental discussions, or recognition of racial biases among his friends—complement the story and characters, rather than upstage them.”

You can enter to win a copy here

You can fan 8th Grade Superzero on FaceBook here

To find out more, please visit Olugbemisola at www.olugbemisola.com.