Day 11: Nansubuga Nagadya Isdahl

February 11, 2018

photo credit: Paige Louw


“My goal is to focus on crafting stories for global audiences inspired by my Ugandan heritage. Set primarily in East and Southern Africa, my stories aim to illuminate the everyday and diverse experiences of African children, while celebrating human universality.” says Nansubuga Nagadya Isdahl on Mater Mea. And with its celebration of both the unique and the universal, SLEEP WELL, SIBA AND SABA reads like a loving literary hug. Please join us in welcoming Nansubuga Nagadya Isdahl and her children’s literature debut!

The Journey:
I think like many writers, my path to publishing started long ago…as a reader. I read quite a bit as a child and as a young adult, and at some point (about 15 years ago), I recognized that stories that featured an African perspective were missing along the spectrum of fiction from children’s literature to adult literary fiction.  I noticed an even larger absence of African stories written by African writers but wasn’t sure what role I could play. My career path eventually led to work in international development as a writer and editor for specialized UN agencies and international NGOs. I write about a broad range of topics from public health to social protection, education, and other rights-based issues for projects in East and Southern Africa. My family is from Uganda so working in the development context had always been an aspiration.
Over the last decade of working and living in East and Southern Africa, and more recently while living in Johannesburg when I was pregnant with my daughter, I returned to this idea that brown, and more specifically African faces, were missing from the books that I would want to share with her. At the same time, I couldn’t find a children’s book about Uganda that captured how I felt about the country. I also vividly remember so many people struggling to pronounce my Ugandan name while growing up in the US, and very much wanted my daughter to see her own Ugandan name reflected on the bookshelf (Saba is short for Nsaba, which is my daughter’s name).
With all of this as fuel, I decided to take a leap and write a story for my daughter that captured my love of Uganda and that portrayed the many beautiful things that I love about the country. That story was Sleep Well, Siba and Saba and my husband insisted that I try to publish it. Since then, I have not looked back.

The Back Story:
Once I conceived of Siba and Saba, I had to think about where the best literary home for the story would be. Not knowing any published authors personally, or anything about the publishing world for that matter, I reached out to some friends for their contacts and did quite a bit of research online. I also realized that with my story, the illustrations the way in which Uganda would be represented mattered just as much as the story. Through the book, I wanted to create a space for the beauty of Uganda to be celebrated in the world, and by global audiences. From my research, however, it seemed that an author had very little input on the selection of an illustrator or the illustration style at larger publishing houses. Based on that alone, I thought it would be a good idea to focus on a smaller, independent publisher. I spent several months searching online for publishers that focused on diverse stories, and when I found Lantana, I had a gut feeling that they were the one. I sent my story out once, only to them as an exclusive submission, and the rest is………

The Inspiration:
My first inspiration can be found very close to home from my family. I am internally motivated to honor my lineage and culture, as I believe my grandfather would have wanted it. I have witnessed such unsung nobility and grace in African families. I feel obligated to share these storiesif even through the lens of a story for children.
I also draw a lot of inspiration these days from contemporary African visual artists, like Njideka Akunyili Crosby (Nigeria) and Billy Zangewa (Malawi/South Africa). I’m also a fan of the British-born, Ghanaian Lynette Yiadom-Boakye. All three of these women have an amazing, textured brilliance to their artworks that inspires me to create their works are worlds and stories unto themselves. I am also currently absolutely inspired by the prolific Japanese author-illustrator Tarō Gomi, who has written hundreds of books for readers of all ages. I find the simplicity of his illustrations stunning.

The Process:
I usually start with a concept or an idea, a niggling feeling really, that turns into an idea. And then I take it from there. I write it out, as bad as it may be. And then I refine and refine over months (and sometimes years). I just write…and re-write.
* Where Do We Go From Here? (What are your ideas for next steps, for artists, young people — toward a more just world. And: what projects do you have coming up next?)
I have set my personal sights on Africa. Many efforts from business and development to art and storytelling have emerged in recent years to help shift the African narrative. I include myself in that process largely through African-inspired children’s books, but also as a champion of contemporary African art and other projects that focus on the beauty that is black and African culture. I think given the current climate, this has considerable value if we want to raise children that are considerate, empathetic, and have a more global outlook.
In terms of upcoming projects, I have another children’s book coming out with Lantana in the fall and several more stories in progress. I also recently launched an art consultancy, Africa Facing Art, with my husband. Africa Facing Art’s mission is to connect U.S. public and private spaces, and collections, with the contemporary art of Africa.
For any author, artist, or young person looking to make a change, start in any way you can. Just start. I deferred so many dreams when I was younger. I encourage everyone to take that leap. Now.


Day 1: Useni Eugene Perkins

February 1, 2018

Poet, playwright, and youth development professional Useni Eugene Perkins has a long history of distinguished work; it was some time before one of his most well-known poems was publicly known to be his, even though “if you were a black child in a Black classroom anywhere in the United States since 1975, there is a chance you recited Perkins.”

HEY BLACK CHILD, illustrated by Bryan Collier, was reintroduced to the world in 2017. School Library Journal calls it “a rousing celebration and call to action, this book is a great choice for every library.” The Brown Bookshelf is honoured to welcome Useni Eugene Perkins.

    The Journey

My journey as a writer began when I was in grade school. Having been reared in an artistic environment, I was exposed to many of the writers who were participants in Chicago’s Black Arts Renaissance in the early forties. My father Marion Perkins, a self-taught sculptor, was a central figure in this movement which included Black writers like Margaret G. Burroughs, Theodore Ward, Margaret Walker, Willard Motley and Gwendolyn Brooks. He also knew Richard Wright , Paul Robeson and Langston Hughes. I read the works of all these writers but was primarily influenced by Langston Hughes and Richard Wright.

When the Black Arts Movement began to emerge in the early sixties, my first book of poems AN APOLOGY TO MY AFRICAN BROTHER was published by Free Black Press in 1965. This volume was followed by BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL, SILHOUETTE, and MEMORIES AND IMAGES. However, my writings were not confined to poetry and in 1975 Third World Press published HOME IS A DIRTY STREET: THE SOCIAL OPPRESSION OF BLACK CHILDREN, a sociological analysis of Black children growing up in Chicago. The imminent historian Lerone Bennett Jr., cited the book as “… one of the important on the sociology of streets since the publication of BLACK METROPOLIS” by Dr. Sinclair Drake and Horace Cayton. In keeping with my interest in the social development of Black children, Third World Press published HARVESTING NEW GENERATIONS: THE POSTIVE DEVELOPMENT OF BLACK YOUTH in 1986.

    Back Story

Although I had never seriously thought about writing books for children, I was familiar with and admired the works of Julius Lester, Tom Feelings, Toni Cade Bambara and Virginia Hamilton. However, I also was interested in playwriting and in 1975 wrote a musical for children entitled BLACK FAIRY, which was a play about a young boy who lacked self-esteem. My motivation for writing Black Fairy was because I felt there were few plays that emphasized Black history and culture to inspire Black children. The musical included twelve songs and Hey Black Child was one of the lyrics. It was performed in many venues throughout the Midwest and awarded a citation of merit after it was performed at St Mary College in Detroit by the late mayor Coleman Young. Hey Black Child became an instant favorite of the thousands of children who saw the production. Because of its popularity, Third World Press published Black Fairy in 1986 , in a volume bearing the same name. The book also included two other children’s musicals, Young John Henry and the Legend of Deadwood Dick.

Despite being written as a lyric, Hey Black Child was being recited as a poem by many children and some teachers had their students recite it each day before classes.

    The Process


Mistakenly, over the years, Hey Black Child was being attributed to Countee Cullen or Maya Angelou.

What may have given greater creditability to this belief was when three year old Pe’Tehn Raighn-Kem recited the poem on Val Warner’s television show in Chicago. Later, on Steve Harvey’s nationally televised Little Big Shots, she recited it again but identified me as the author.

However, even though it had been verified that I was the author of Hey Black Child, it continued to be attributed to other poets.

When Little Brown and Company contacted me in 2015 about doing an illustrated book on Hey Black Child, I was pleasantly surprised. To learn that Hey Black Child had received national attention and continued to be an uplifting poem for Black children was extremely inspiring. Also, the fact that the multiple award-winning artist Bryan Collier was to be the illustrator was also gratifying. Unquestionably, his creative images of children have done much to embellish my poem.

    Where Do We Go From Here?

Although some progress has been made in changing the misinformation and stereotypes that have maligned Black history and culture, racism still resonates in every facet of American life. I believe literature, of every genre, can play an important role in correcting this problem. This is particularly true of illustrated books because it is during the formative years that children begin to form their perceptions about race and life in general. The images children are exposed to during this period will have a great influence on them when they become adults.

If given the opportunity, I would like to write illustrated books for middle grade students. Among these books, I would include Paul Robeson, Ida B. Wells, Toussaint L’Ouverture and Kwame Nkrumah. The latter two books have particular relevancy because Black children need to learn that the Black struggle for freedom in America is also linked to Africa and the Black Diaspora. Racial consciousness is critical to Black children who have historically been indoctrinated to perceive their African heritage as a jaded legacy.

Finally, I’m deeply grateful to Little Brown and Company for publishing Hey Black Child and making it possible for thousands of Black children to visualize their God-given talents.

Peace, Harmony and Love.


Voices of Change: A Parent Speaks

October 16, 2017

Blackness
by Brenda Payne Whiteman

I love my blackness
Good to know who I am
Hailing from my parents’ and ancestors’
Collective womb
Nurturing, strong and proud

I face a cold world
When pain is inflicted
With words that cut into my heart
Sharp as a knife
By looks that burn a hole in my soul

I feel invisible at times in a sea of whiteness
By those encaged in bold, cocky entitlement
Basking in their reality

I have news
The world does not revolve
Around you
It revolves around us all

We all share this planet
As human beings
Who laugh, cry, and bleed the same red
No one is more supreme than you or me
We all have something to give

Brenda Payne Whiteman is an aspiring children’s picture book writer and a member of the New Jersey chapter of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. She is a parent, age 58.

Read about Voices of Change on The Brown Bookshelf.

The Brown Bookshelf opens up this space to you — to young readers, to parents and caregivers, to educators, and all who work directly with children and teens. See previous entries here.

What are you thinking? How are you feeling about what is happening in our towns and cities, our world? Where do we go from here? What would you like to see happen? What do you want to do? How can we offer our support?

Please feel free to share your words and/or images with us, by sending them to teambrownbookshelf@gmail.com. And we will post them here. Posts with profanity, explicit imagery, etc will not be accepted or published. Unless a contributor requests otherwise, we will share first initials, age and/or position only.


Voices of Change: Youth Speak

October 2, 2017

 

strongerthanhate

Artwork by JGL, 13

 

 

Untitled

-by A, 13

Strove through strife
A motto for Black children
Blackness is excellence
We are not too dark to be noticed
It is not a reason for abuse
Blackness is beauty
Community
Magic
Love
Hardships
Strength.
They tried to shape our hands
To fit only chains
We made a fist.
To show love
In our community
To hold a pen
Mightier than a sword
To hold a microphone
That ensures we will be heard–
Say it loud
Be it loud
Black and proud.

 

 

 

 

What are you thinking? How are you feeling about what is happening in our towns and cities, our world? Where do we go from here? What would you like to see happen? What do you want to do? How can we offer our support?

 

Your lives matter. The Brown Bookshelf opens up this space to you — to young readers, to parents and caregivers, to educators, and all who work directly with children and teens.

Send your submission to teambrownbookshelf@gmail.com

 

Please feel free to share your words and/or images with us, by sending them to teambrownbookshelf@gmail.com. And we will post them here (Unless a contributor requests otherwise, we will share first initials, age and/or position only.)

Read this for more about Voices of Change on The Brown Bookshelf.

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Voices of Change: A New Series on the Brown Bookshelf

October 2, 2017

illustration by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

“As we struggle to bridge the chasm and search for common ground, we must remember our strength, show our resilience and think of the children.”

Those were the words of the Brown Bookshelf’s Declaration in Support of Children in November of 2016, and we reaffirm that commitment. In the wake of continued violence, bigotry, and state-sanctioned expressions of hate across the country, we are thinking of you, our readers, every day. It takes love and courage to stand up for what’s right. There is only one side in the fight against evil. One of our promises was to listen, and that promise stands stronger than ever.

Your lives matter. The Brown Bookshelf opens up this space to you — to young readers, to parents and caregivers, to educators, and all who work directly with children and teens.

What are you thinking? How are you feeling about what is happening in our towns and cities, our world? Where do we go from here? What would you like to see happen? What do you want to do? How can we offer our support?

Please feel free to share your words and/or images with us, by sending them to teambrownbookshelf@gmail.com. And we will post them here (Unless a contributor requests otherwise, we will share first initials, age and/or position only.)

We begin with reflections from two young people, a poem and work of illustration.

Educators are using the hashtags #CharlottesvilleCurriculum, #CharlottesvilleSyllabus, #TeachResistance, #ImmigrationSyllabus on Twitter to share resources related to these issues. Scholars, writers, artists, and activists have begun to collect resources that can be helpful in your classroom, library, and home. In the wake of the hate crimes in Charlottesville, VA, there are a number of “Charlottesville Syllabi” available free online, such as The University of Virginia Graduate Student Coalition’s zine that continues to be updated and revised, and the jstor compendium. The Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility offers a number of free classroom resources, including this one on DACA, this on responding to violence like a mass shooting, and another to foster a sense of connection between young people, their communities, their world. Teaching for Change shares a bibliography and other resources on Puerto Rico’s past and present. Teaching Tolerance also offers some tips on discussing the crises in places like Puerto Rico, and Rethinking Schools shares the stories of student activism.

We continue to “plant seeds of empathy, fairness and empowerment through words and pictures.” In keeping with the Brown Bookshelf’s mission to celebrate Black creators of children’s literature, we’d like to share a few titles that we think can promote justice during these times: please feel free to share your recommendations in the comments.

Touch, by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

illustration by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

    Picture Books

 

Mama’s Nightingale: A Story of Immigration and Separation
By Edwidge Danticat, illustrated by Leslie Staub

Tiny Stitches
By Gwendolyn Hooks

If You Were a Kid During the Civil Rights Movement
By Gwendolyn Hooks

Milo’s Museum
By Zetta Elliott

We March
By Shane W. Evans

Poet: The Remarkable Story of George Moses Horton
By Don Tate

One Million Men and Me
Kelly Starling Lyons, illustrated by Peter Ambush

Afro-Bets Book of Black Heroes
By Wade Hudson, Valerie Wilson Wesley

The Great Migration: Journey to the North
By Eloise Greenfield

Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer
By Carole Boston Weatherford

White Socks Only
By Evelyn Coleman

Malcolm Little: The Boy Who Grew Up to Be Malcolm X
By Ilyasah Shabazz

March On! The Day My Brother Martin Changed the World
By Christine King Farris

Preaching to the Chickens
By Jabari Asim

As Fast As Words Could Fly
By Pamela M. Tuck

Goin’ Someplace Special
By Patricia C. McKissack

Freedom on the Menu
By Carole Boston Weatherford

The Other Side
By Jacqueline Woodson

Freedom Train
By Evelyn Coleman

Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down
By Andrea Davis Pinkney

Child of the Civil Rights Movement
By Paula Young Shelton

Rosa
By Nikki Giovanni

Coretta Scott
By Ntozake Shange

Sweet Smell of Roses
By Angela Johnson

    Middle Grade

 

The Watsons Go to Birmingham
By Christopher Paul Curtis

The Laura Line
By Crystal Allen

Her Stories: African American Folktales, Fairy Tales, and True Tales
By Virginia Hamilton

One Crazy Summer, P.S. Be Eleven, Gone Crazy in Alabama (Gaither Sisters Trilogy)
By Rita Williams Garcia

Let It Shine! Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters
By Andrea Davis Pinkney

Through My Eyes
By Ruby Bridges

Pathfinders: The Journeys of 16 Extraordinary Black Souls
By Tonya Bolden

Maritcha: A 19th Century American Girl
By Tonya Bolden

Midnight Without a Moon
By Linda Williams Jackson

 

    Young Adult

 

March Trilogy
By Congressman John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell

Piecing Me Together
By Renée Watson

This Side of Home
By Renée Watson

The Hate U Give
Angie Thomas

Dear Martin
Nic Stone

Parable of the Sower
By Octavia Butler

Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom
By Lynda Blackmon Lowery

Brown Girl Dreaming
By Jacqueline Woodson

The Rock And The River
By Kekla Magoon

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Sweet Blackberry: Karyn Parsons Is Sharing Stories We All Need Now

June 29, 2017

It seems like Karyn Parsons was born to start Sweet Blackberry, the non-profit organization dedicated to bringing little known stories of African American achievement to light. Her mother was a librarian, and “I did grow up in libraries,” says the star of the long-running hit show The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. “The advantage of having a mother who worked there was that you could check books out way over the limit. I grew up with books around the house too, and with a strong love of books and reading.” Parsons mother also made sure to share with her the stories and information about African American culture that she’d been told as a child growing up in the South. “From time to time she was surprised by the things that I wasn’t being taught in school,” says Parsons.

Parsons began dreaming of Sweet Blackberry while her mother worked at the Black Resource Center in South Central Los Angeles. She was playing Hilary Banks on the Fresh Prince and her mother would call to share stories of people she found fascinating. “She told me stories in ways that made them come alive.” And one of the first was the story of Henry Box Brown.
“I had never heard his story before,” she remembers. “I was fascinated! I wasn’t a big history person in school — I couldn’t stand history! It was always presented to me in this very dry and abstract way… ‘Memorize these dates, do a report.’ Nobody was bringing it to you where you lived.” The tale of the enslaved man who literally mailed himself to freedom in a box “still feels like a fable, it’s amazing! Such a magnificent story,” she says. Parsons in turn shared Brown’s story with friends.

“I would tell my friends about it and no one had heard this story, it was so incredible. I became so determined that I was going to share this story with kids.”

But starring on a television show took precedence for a while. Parsons kept Henry Brown’s story in the back of her mind and heart, and would occasionally scribble notes, etc. It was when she was pregnant with her first child that she started thinking about ways to supplement her daughter’s education. “What do they teach the kids in schools these days? What can I expect her to learn? What can I give her?” Motherhood brought with it new responsibilities and opportunities. “My daughter’s watching.” And Sweet Blackberry was born.

Parsons points out that it’s important that we go beyond the usual MLK and Harriet Tubman stories, as important and beautiful as they are. “There’s so much more…I have to get these out.” As she wondered how she’d go about sharing stories like Brown’s, her husband, an independent filmmaker, encouraged her to “just do it.”

Parsons started with the idea to write books, but indie publishing was not as accessible as it is now. She had studied filmmaking, and knew the industry. “I knew I could make a film. And I could press it, make DVDs.” Parsons started talking to friends and acquaintances in the business, and the positive response was encouraging. “There was so much goodwill,” she remembers.

As Sweet Blackberry kicks off a Kickstarter campaign that will bring the story of aviator Bessie Coleman to the screen, Parsons says that she’s more than ready to share Coleman’s story with kids and families. “I love the way Bessie Coleman’s life can show kids that all of us have opportunities for greatness despite the obstacles in our lives,” she says.

And Sweet Blackberry has had its challenges – bringing high-quality animated stories to the screen is not easy work. Some are surprised that a television star is using a crowdfunding campaign. “Everybody thinks you have money because of Fresh Prince,” she says, laughing. “It’s hard to get people to understand that we really need your help,” points out Parsons. “We have this short window of time to raise all of this money or else we don’t keep any of it. We need people to respond now, any way they can – even a dollar. Every little bit matters.”

Choosing and crafting the stories is no easy feat either. “When you sit down to write the story, and consider your young audience, you really have to consider the story you’re trying to tell,” says Parsons.

“It’s not just a person and their achievements, but how you’ll bring this story to young people in a way that they can understand it.”

Though she’d dreamed of sharing the story of Henry “Box” Brown for years, sitting down to write a children’s story of a family that was broken up by this country’s brutal system of slavery was difficult. “The narrative was heart-wrenching…but I didn’t want to sugarcoat things.” Parsons saw that using animals to ask questions in The Journey of Henry Box Brown, narrated by Alfre Woodard, offered a child with some distance from the experience of slavery “An opportunity to understand why one might go to such lengths to escape it.”

Sweet Blackberry went on to tell the story of accomplished inventor Garrett Morgan in Garrett’s Gift, narrated by Queen Latifah. She started looking for an angle that children could connect with. “As I researched, I tapped into his young life, his having so much energy, and how he had a creative mind and how children can get labeled negatively because of that.”

Parsons always knew that she’d tell prima ballerina Janet Collins’ extraordinary story of refusing to dance in whiteface then finding success on her own terms — the result is the powerful Dancing in the Light, illustrated by award-winning artist R. Gregory Christie. While there are an abundance of under-the radar stories to tell Parsons remains thoughtful about her work. “There are some I’ve had to shelve for now because I’m not sure yet how to tell those stories to children…I have to figure out the way in.” All three of the Sweet Blackberry award-winning productions were screened on HBO, and are currently streaming on Netflix.

And now, Bessie Coleman. “I’m so inspired by her…envious of her having that spirit, to be such a badass…She was so ahead of her time. If she was happening right now, she’d be all over Facebook. And this was 100 years ago!”

Children get these messages that “Once in a while, a Black person comes along and does something.” It’s important to Parsons that Sweet Blackberry share the stories of all of the African Americans “who were such a part of the building of this country, such a part of the fabric of this country…These stories are for all children. These are American stories that every child should know.”

Parsons is focused on the Bessie Coleman project, and plans to use other media, including books, to share these vital stories. While she can’t tell us what’s after Coleman, she can promise that “It’s gonna be good!”

But first, the campaign must be fully funded for the production to happen. Parsons believes that not only is Coleman’s story exciting and groundbreaking and remarkable in many ways, it’s especially necessary for the times we’re in right now.

“So many children are feeling helpless, and challenged. Bessie Coleman’s story empowers them and reminds them of what they’re capable of.”

To make a donation of any amount to help bring the Bessie Coleman story to the screen, visit the campaign page now. There are only a few days left, and Sweet Blackberry’s work is more important than ever.

Sweet Blackberry Sizzle from karyn parsons on Vimeo.


Nicola Yoon on #BlackGirlMagic, How Love Changes Everything, and Showing the Possibilities

June 6, 2017

credit: Sonya Sones

Nicola Yoon is the #1 NYT bestselling author of Everything, Everything, which is now a major motion picture, and The Sun Is Also a Star, a National Book Award finalist, Michael L. Printz Honor Book and a Coretta Scott King New Talent Award winner. She grew up in Jamaica and Brooklyn, and lives in Los Angeles with her family.

We featured Nicola back in 2016; a LOT has happened since. We caught up with her for an update. Welcome back, Nicola!

You’ve mentioned that you wrote Everything, Everything because you wanted your daughter to see herself reflected in media. Can you share some of the responses you’ve gotten from readers, and now from those who’ve seen the film?

The response from readers has just been incredible and, not gonna lie, some of them have made me cry. Every day — every single day — I get at least one email from a reader or a viewer telling me how much it means to them at Maddy is a person of color. When my little girl first met Amandla Stenberg on the set of the movie, the first thing she said to me is “she looks just like me.” She said it again when she saw the movie at the Los Angeles premiere. I’ll never be able to put into words how much those moments have meant to me.

In an interview about Everything, Everything, you said that “I didn’t want her to be in a prison as much as yearning for something more, something different.” Why was that important to you? What was the process of getting that concept on paper?

One of the themes I was exploring with the book was the ways in which love changes you. Love is a force. Sometimes it changes you for the better. Sometimes for the worse. In the book, Maddy is very happy with her life before she meets Olly. After she meets and falls in love Olly, she begins to look at the world anew. I think one of the things that love does is open you up to the world and make you more vulnerable. The ways in which we respond to that vulnerability is something I was interested in exploring.

What were some of the challenges for you in the process of seeing the story move from the page to the screen? What surprised you? And what was your cameo experience like?

In the beginning it’s a little hard to let go of your characters, but that went away quickly for me. One of the best moments I had was when I was reading a revision of the script that had a scene that wasn’t in the book. I loved the scene so much that I wished I’d written it. That moment made me happy because both the script and the movie are new pieces of art. Now there are more stories about Maddy and Olly out in the world.

The cameo experience was so great! We are “family on the beach” in one of the Hawaii scenes. It’s about three seconds of me, my husband, and my daughter splashing in the waves in the background. Funnily, the scene took 45 minutes to film because my daughter kept pointing at the drone camera that filmed it so we had to do take after take :)

Congratulations on the success of The Sun is Also A Star! Where did that story start? How was the writing process similar to or different from working on Everything, Everything? What did you feel that you learned and incorporated into Sun? Now that you’re a page-to-screen vet, what are you most looking forward to in the filmmaking process?

Thank you so much! It really started for me from the Carl Sagan quote -— “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” I wanted to tell a love story about two people, but I wanted to include the universe of things that made it possible for the two people to fall in love. I’m really looking forward to the adaptation process. Tracy Oliver is writing the script as we speak!

What does the phrase #BlackGirlMagic mean to you? Where do you see or use that idea in your own work?

It means that black girls are allowed the full range of the human experience. In our current media we see so many stereotyped notions what it means to be black. One of the things I want to do in my work is to push back against those ideas. Black girls can be anyone and love anyone. We are allowed to be the main character.

We are allowed to be smart and beautiful and funny and soft and strong and vulnerable and geeky. We are allowed to be.

In The Sun Is Also A Star, you incorporate issues surrounding immigration, and mentioned in an interview that you’d love to see the immigration conversation “start from a place of empathy.” How do you think your readers can make that happen? How do you think that reading can promote empathy?

I think that books promote empathy. It’s hard to spend 400 pages in the lives of characters without seeing their humanity and coming to a place of understanding.

Like those who’ve come before us, our children, our readers, we’re living in challenging times. Do you think that’s reflected in the work that you do? In the stories that you tell? In the way that you work? How?

I think the times have always been challenging. One of the most powerful things that books can do is give us hope show us what is possible not only for ourselves, but for other people.

What do you think are the keys to writing successful YA romance? What are some of your favorites?

I love when characters fall in love with each other’s ideas of the world. I love when you can see that they are making each other grow and think and explore the world in new ways. Also, a good kissing scene is not to be underestimated. :) One of my all time favorites is I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson.

Thanks so much, Nicola! We can’t wait to see what’s next. Visit Nicola Yoon online for news and updates.