Grown Too Soon

August 7, 2017

Too many times we’ve heard the refrain “gone too soon” to allude to a life cut short. A wistful phrase lamenting the potential of one who has earned their wings prematurely. Sadly, the sentiment can also be applied to children of color and the premature death of their innocence.  But I’ll call it grown too soon, instead.

In Black culture, being “grown” is never confused with being a “grown up.”  Being a grown up means to reach adulthood and join the rat race, no matter how reluctantly.  To be grown, is to adopt adult mannerisms. This can be a sharp/sassy tongue, acting out or promiscuous behavior. If someone tells you you’re too grown, it ain’t nothing good. And it’s usually followed by a reprimand or worse.  Tressie McMillian Cottom (@tressiemcphd) covers the promiscuity aspect in an excellent NY Times Op-ed.

Few parents allow children to get away with being grown. Yet, if we’re honest with ourselves, very few children of color have the luxury of maintaining child-like innocence beyond the age of 8. Both in my childhood experience and in raising my daughters, I’d say eight was about the time the world reached into our lives and dictated that it could no longer be sugar coated.

Sometimes the experience is a world event (9/11, school shootings, a certain Presidential campaign) and other times it’s more personal – like dealing with overt racism by a classmate. Whatever the situation, it requires the adult to shoot straight with the only thing that’s left, the ugly truth. They’re the conversations no parent likes to have because you know, at its end, you’ve stripped one more layer of innocence from your child.

We’re foolish to think we can keep chipping those layers away without it leading to a little grownness. At the very least, our children come away with a wary world-view made worse as incident after incident shows them how tough things can be when your skin has a tint.

Unless society changes drastically, this is simply the way things are for brown children. Luckily, many parents find ways to balance preparation for the real world with plenty of opportunities to let kids be kids.  And here, I applaud the authors of color who naturally portray this sticky wicket in our fiction. No heavy-handed lessons, just life as it is.

This matter hit home, recently, as I journey closer to the publication of my first MG novel, So Done. My wonderful editor sent over a sample book cover. I loved it. But the sample featured two young girls who looked years older than my 13-year-old characters. Despite the vivid color and fun lettering, the girls’ age was the first thing I noticed. The only, to be honest.

All I could think was – I don’t want these girls portrayed too grown. So Done’s underlying story showcases the adult issues facing the girls. I didn’t want them to look too mature lest anyone begin the age-old cycle of solely blaming young Black people for their grownness. You know the phrase  – “Well no wonder [fill in some offense that’s their fault], look how grown they look.”

I outlined these concerns and after quickly assuring me it was only a mock-up to squarely identify the artistic style and direction, my editor said something else important – that she understood my concerns. That they were noted.

I’d like more people to start there – understand and note the concern. Remember why so many Black kids and other children of color exude an air of seriousness or level of maturity that leans dangerously close to being grown. It’s not an act. And in most cases, the kid isn’t being disrespectful on purpose. They simply can’t unsee the world around them.

Being grown too soon is the reality of far too many of our kids. In order to provide well-rounded depictions of our children, authors of color must be at the table to show exactly how kids are still able to be kids in spite of the grownness thrust upon them.


Sweet Blackberry: Karyn Parsons Is Sharing Stories We All Need Now

June 29, 2017

It seems like Karyn Parsons was born to start Sweet Blackberry, the non-profit organization dedicated to bringing little known stories of African American achievement to light. Her mother was a librarian, and “I did grow up in libraries,” says the star of the long-running hit show The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. “The advantage of having a mother who worked there was that you could check books out way over the limit. I grew up with books around the house too, and with a strong love of books and reading.” Parsons mother also made sure to share with her the stories and information about African American culture that she’d been told as a child growing up in the South. “From time to time she was surprised by the things that I wasn’t being taught in school,” says Parsons.

Parsons began dreaming of Sweet Blackberry while her mother worked at the Black Resource Center in South Central Los Angeles. She was playing Hilary Banks on the Fresh Prince and her mother would call to share stories of people she found fascinating. “She told me stories in ways that made them come alive.” And one of the first was the story of Henry Box Brown.
“I had never heard his story before,” she remembers. “I was fascinated! I wasn’t a big history person in school — I couldn’t stand history! It was always presented to me in this very dry and abstract way… ‘Memorize these dates, do a report.’ Nobody was bringing it to you where you lived.” The tale of the enslaved man who literally mailed himself to freedom in a box “still feels like a fable, it’s amazing! Such a magnificent story,” she says. Parsons in turn shared Brown’s story with friends.

“I would tell my friends about it and no one had heard this story, it was so incredible. I became so determined that I was going to share this story with kids.”

But starring on a television show took precedence for a while. Parsons kept Henry Brown’s story in the back of her mind and heart, and would occasionally scribble notes, etc. It was when she was pregnant with her first child that she started thinking about ways to supplement her daughter’s education. “What do they teach the kids in schools these days? What can I expect her to learn? What can I give her?” Motherhood brought with it new responsibilities and opportunities. “My daughter’s watching.” And Sweet Blackberry was born.

Parsons points out that it’s important that we go beyond the usual MLK and Harriet Tubman stories, as important and beautiful as they are. “There’s so much more…I have to get these out.” As she wondered how she’d go about sharing stories like Brown’s, her husband, an independent filmmaker, encouraged her to “just do it.”

Parsons started with the idea to write books, but indie publishing was not as accessible as it is now. She had studied filmmaking, and knew the industry. “I knew I could make a film. And I could press it, make DVDs.” Parsons started talking to friends and acquaintances in the business, and the positive response was encouraging. “There was so much goodwill,” she remembers.

As Sweet Blackberry kicks off a Kickstarter campaign that will bring the story of aviator Bessie Coleman to the screen, Parsons says that she’s more than ready to share Coleman’s story with kids and families. “I love the way Bessie Coleman’s life can show kids that all of us have opportunities for greatness despite the obstacles in our lives,” she says.

And Sweet Blackberry has had its challenges – bringing high-quality animated stories to the screen is not easy work. Some are surprised that a television star is using a crowdfunding campaign. “Everybody thinks you have money because of Fresh Prince,” she says, laughing. “It’s hard to get people to understand that we really need your help,” points out Parsons. “We have this short window of time to raise all of this money or else we don’t keep any of it. We need people to respond now, any way they can – even a dollar. Every little bit matters.”

Choosing and crafting the stories is no easy feat either. “When you sit down to write the story, and consider your young audience, you really have to consider the story you’re trying to tell,” says Parsons.

“It’s not just a person and their achievements, but how you’ll bring this story to young people in a way that they can understand it.”

Though she’d dreamed of sharing the story of Henry “Box” Brown for years, sitting down to write a children’s story of a family that was broken up by this country’s brutal system of slavery was difficult. “The narrative was heart-wrenching…but I didn’t want to sugarcoat things.” Parsons saw that using animals to ask questions in The Journey of Henry Box Brown, narrated by Alfre Woodard, offered a child with some distance from the experience of slavery “An opportunity to understand why one might go to such lengths to escape it.”

Sweet Blackberry went on to tell the story of accomplished inventor Garrett Morgan in Garrett’s Gift, narrated by Queen Latifah. She started looking for an angle that children could connect with. “As I researched, I tapped into his young life, his having so much energy, and how he had a creative mind and how children can get labeled negatively because of that.”

Parsons always knew that she’d tell prima ballerina Janet Collins’ extraordinary story of refusing to dance in whiteface then finding success on her own terms — the result is the powerful Dancing in the Light, illustrated by award-winning artist R. Gregory Christie. While there are an abundance of under-the radar stories to tell Parsons remains thoughtful about her work. “There are some I’ve had to shelve for now because I’m not sure yet how to tell those stories to children…I have to figure out the way in.” All three of the Sweet Blackberry award-winning productions were screened on HBO, and are currently streaming on Netflix.

And now, Bessie Coleman. “I’m so inspired by her…envious of her having that spirit, to be such a badass…She was so ahead of her time. If she was happening right now, she’d be all over Facebook. And this was 100 years ago!”

Children get these messages that “Once in a while, a Black person comes along and does something.” It’s important to Parsons that Sweet Blackberry share the stories of all of the African Americans “who were such a part of the building of this country, such a part of the fabric of this country…These stories are for all children. These are American stories that every child should know.”

Parsons is focused on the Bessie Coleman project, and plans to use other media, including books, to share these vital stories. While she can’t tell us what’s after Coleman, she can promise that “It’s gonna be good!”

But first, the campaign must be fully funded for the production to happen. Parsons believes that not only is Coleman’s story exciting and groundbreaking and remarkable in many ways, it’s especially necessary for the times we’re in right now.

“So many children are feeling helpless, and challenged. Bessie Coleman’s story empowers them and reminds them of what they’re capable of.”

To make a donation of any amount to help bring the Bessie Coleman story to the screen, visit the campaign page now. There are only a few days left, and Sweet Blackberry’s work is more important than ever.

Sweet Blackberry Sizzle from karyn parsons on Vimeo.


Leah Henderson and the Release of Her Debut Novel

June 12, 2017

 

On February 8, 2017, Brown Bookshelf member, Tracey Baptiste interviewed Leah Henderson about her upcoming novel, One Shadow on the Wall. Leah discussed the spark that led to the idea, her writing process that led to an agent, an editor and a book soon to be published. Her story was fascinating. Read it here Day 8, 2017 Leah Henderson.

 

Now our readers want to know, what is it like to hold your first book  and share it with readers? One Shadow on the Wall was released on June 8, 2017. Now that she has had time to reflect, Leah is ready to share her feelings.

“When people ask how I’m feeling now that my book is out in the world, they generally assume my first response will be excitement, but right now I am truly in awe. Not just because I have hoped, dreamed, prayed, and wished for this day, but because of the outpouring of love, support, and encouragement I’ve received from the moment I started this project. Today, I am beyond grateful for that.

I am grateful to my family for always striving to show me my possibilities. I am grateful to a young boy in Senegal that through just one glance showed me strength and the makings of a story. I am grateful to my grad school professor for seeing the possibilities in a few short pages when it took me a year to believe and see them myself. I am grateful to my next grad school professor for giving his time to read “more pages of Mor” above and beyond the other work he was already reading from me. 

I am grateful to the amazing writer who stepped on my path the day of my grad school graduation and after asking “What is next for Mor?” offered to help me figure out just that through pages and pages of dead ends and detours. I am grateful to an agent who believed in Mor (and me) when others said they weren’t sure where a story like his would fit in the market. I am grateful to my wonderful editors and for my publisher for bringing Mor’s story into their family. I am grateful to friends and strangers who have kept me going with phone calls, emails, texts, kind words, smiles, hugs and oh yes . . . plenty of chocolate. I am grateful for so much today and every day!
So that is exactly how I am feeling right now.”  

Leah is enjoying life with One Shadow on the Wall. Check out the pictures from her release party and book signings. If you don’t have your copy yet, get it soon! Don’t forget to recommend it to your local library.

Visit Leah’s website for more information. 

 

 


Nicola Yoon on #BlackGirlMagic, How Love Changes Everything, and Showing the Possibilities

June 6, 2017

credit: Sonya Sones

Nicola Yoon is the #1 NYT bestselling author of Everything, Everything, which is now a major motion picture, and The Sun Is Also a Star, a National Book Award finalist, Michael L. Printz Honor Book and a Coretta Scott King New Talent Award winner. She grew up in Jamaica and Brooklyn, and lives in Los Angeles with her family.

We featured Nicola back in 2016; a LOT has happened since. We caught up with her for an update. Welcome back, Nicola!

You’ve mentioned that you wrote Everything, Everything because you wanted your daughter to see herself reflected in media. Can you share some of the responses you’ve gotten from readers, and now from those who’ve seen the film?

The response from readers has just been incredible and, not gonna lie, some of them have made me cry. Every day — every single day — I get at least one email from a reader or a viewer telling me how much it means to them at Maddy is a person of color. When my little girl first met Amandla Stenberg on the set of the movie, the first thing she said to me is “she looks just like me.” She said it again when she saw the movie at the Los Angeles premiere. I’ll never be able to put into words how much those moments have meant to me.

In an interview about Everything, Everything, you said that “I didn’t want her to be in a prison as much as yearning for something more, something different.” Why was that important to you? What was the process of getting that concept on paper?

One of the themes I was exploring with the book was the ways in which love changes you. Love is a force. Sometimes it changes you for the better. Sometimes for the worse. In the book, Maddy is very happy with her life before she meets Olly. After she meets and falls in love Olly, she begins to look at the world anew. I think one of the things that love does is open you up to the world and make you more vulnerable. The ways in which we respond to that vulnerability is something I was interested in exploring.

What were some of the challenges for you in the process of seeing the story move from the page to the screen? What surprised you? And what was your cameo experience like?

In the beginning it’s a little hard to let go of your characters, but that went away quickly for me. One of the best moments I had was when I was reading a revision of the script that had a scene that wasn’t in the book. I loved the scene so much that I wished I’d written it. That moment made me happy because both the script and the movie are new pieces of art. Now there are more stories about Maddy and Olly out in the world.

The cameo experience was so great! We are “family on the beach” in one of the Hawaii scenes. It’s about three seconds of me, my husband, and my daughter splashing in the waves in the background. Funnily, the scene took 45 minutes to film because my daughter kept pointing at the drone camera that filmed it so we had to do take after take :)

Congratulations on the success of The Sun is Also A Star! Where did that story start? How was the writing process similar to or different from working on Everything, Everything? What did you feel that you learned and incorporated into Sun? Now that you’re a page-to-screen vet, what are you most looking forward to in the filmmaking process?

Thank you so much! It really started for me from the Carl Sagan quote -— “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” I wanted to tell a love story about two people, but I wanted to include the universe of things that made it possible for the two people to fall in love. I’m really looking forward to the adaptation process. Tracy Oliver is writing the script as we speak!

What does the phrase #BlackGirlMagic mean to you? Where do you see or use that idea in your own work?

It means that black girls are allowed the full range of the human experience. In our current media we see so many stereotyped notions what it means to be black. One of the things I want to do in my work is to push back against those ideas. Black girls can be anyone and love anyone. We are allowed to be the main character.

We are allowed to be smart and beautiful and funny and soft and strong and vulnerable and geeky. We are allowed to be.

In The Sun Is Also A Star, you incorporate issues surrounding immigration, and mentioned in an interview that you’d love to see the immigration conversation “start from a place of empathy.” How do you think your readers can make that happen? How do you think that reading can promote empathy?

I think that books promote empathy. It’s hard to spend 400 pages in the lives of characters without seeing their humanity and coming to a place of understanding.

Like those who’ve come before us, our children, our readers, we’re living in challenging times. Do you think that’s reflected in the work that you do? In the stories that you tell? In the way that you work? How?

I think the times have always been challenging. One of the most powerful things that books can do is give us hope show us what is possible not only for ourselves, but for other people.

What do you think are the keys to writing successful YA romance? What are some of your favorites?

I love when characters fall in love with each other’s ideas of the world. I love when you can see that they are making each other grow and think and explore the world in new ways. Also, a good kissing scene is not to be underestimated. :) One of my all time favorites is I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson.

Thanks so much, Nicola! We can’t wait to see what’s next. Visit Nicola Yoon online for news and updates.


The “Hole” in KidLit

May 22, 2017

For years I worked as an anthology editor for McGraw-Hill and other educational publishing houses. My job was choosing literature for elementary schools, pairing fiction with nonfiction, commissioning new pieces to work with published works, and balancing a very long list of authors and illustrators to ensure that we had even numbers between sexes and ethnicities. Finding authors and illustrators of color was always a challenge as a result of a lack of diversity in the KidLit industry, but the one area that always remained a huge problem was finding science or technical texts written by authors of color.

For every educational publishing company I worked with as an in-house editor, or as a consultant/freelancer, this was a problem. It’s been a long time since I left school and library publishing, so I hadn’t thought about this problem in a while, but it all came back to me while having a conversation with Preeti Chhibber, who works for Scholastic on the Reading Club selections. When The Jumbies (my MG novel) was chosen as a Scholastic Reading Club book, it was featured in a We Need Diverse Books special edition flyer. As Pretti and I cooed over the pages of the flyer, she confessed that they had a very difficult time finding science books written by authors of color. There were plenty of biographies of scientists, but that’s not exactly what they were looking for. The writer they were able to feature was Neil deGrasse Tyson. A great choice, but surely he couldn’t be the only one.

I racked my brain trying to think of a nonwhite equivalent of someone like Seymour Simon, who was a go-to author for science nonfiction, and came up empty.

Hence, the hole in KidLit that authors of color need to fill. The school and library market is very interested in diversifying their offerings, and having a book selected for an anthology means kids all over the country will read your work. It’s a big deal. And I know there are authors of color who also like science topics. So, what are you waiting for? There’s a hole you need to plug.


Where Do We Go From Here? Continuing the Conversation With Pat Cummings

May 9, 2017

Here at the Brown Bookshelf, we’ve spoken often and long on the issues and ideas expressed in the Open Declaration. We do this work to lift up our young readers and show them how they can survive, thrive, and soar in this world. For many of us, the way forward might be clear, for others, not so much. We may sign on to petitions and open declarations, forward emails, RT, and “like”, and these can all be good and powerful things. But we believe that it’s important to reflect on how we will hold ourselves accountable, how we will act, and reflect; how we will “live out commitment to using our talents and varied forms of artistic expression to help eliminate the fear that takes root in the human heart amid lack of familiarity and understanding of others; the type of fear that feeds stereotypes, bitterness, racism and hatred; the type of fear that so often leads to tragic violence and senseless death.” We’ll present a series of those posts here; signatories asking, wondering, and doing an essential question: Where do we go from here?

I’m especially honoured to share thoughts from award-winning author, artist, educator, and activist Pat Cummings. As a literacy educator and freshman college student, I carried JUST US WOMEN, illustrated by Ms. Cummings, on all of my summer home visits to families — it was a favourite in every one of the Harlem and Washington Heights homes I visited, as inspired young children and parents shared their own stories and photos of family road trips and vacations. Two of my own daughter’s ABSOLUTE first favourite books were Cummings’ MY AUNT CAME BACK and CLEAN YOUR ROOM, HARVEY MOON — even before she could read, she was enthralled by the wordplay and the joyful Brown faces on the pages.

I’m more than thrilled to welcome Pat Cummings back to The Brown Bookshelf.

Why did you sign the declaration?
A book is personal. Through words and pictures I have a chance to talk directly to more children than I’ll ever meet. Children who may take what’s in the pages of the book to heart. I’ve heard that personalities are formed by the time a child reaches six years of age. So, knowing that this is a window, an opportunity to express positive, open and humane ways of interacting with others on the planet, I feel children’s books can be more effective, more subversive even, than trying to get through to adults who are inexplicably locked in their prejudices, fears and arrogance. I signed the declaration because every point and sentiment in it aligns with my own beliefs.

How do you describe the intersection between art and activism? Who/what has influenced you in that area?
The arts, any art really, is an expression of your core beliefs. It’s like your handwriting or accent: your belief system is distinctly your own. And art provides an avenue for us to express what we think, love, believe. I’m not sure what would happen if we existed in an utopian society. But, faced with the disturbing attitudes and actions around us today and, knowing that vulnerable, open children are taking their cues from what they’re seeing, I think artists have to be activists. Who has influenced me? My mother and father. They are the ones who taught me to use critical thinking, to not only observe what is but to structure a pathway to what can be.

What next steps do you plan to take to carry out your pledge?

My goal is to ensure that readers find positive imagery and healthy relationships in the pages of my books.

In this business, we all try to suggest creative, positive resolutions to any situation. I’m committed to getting at the humaness of my characters…a colorless, genderless, ageless humanity that prevails regardless of nationalities, creeds or isms. Most of my characters are Black. And while that’s partially to address our underrepresentation in children’s literature, it’s also because I’m sick and disheartened about the widespread hostility and misunderstanding that has such negative effects. Walter Dean Myers once told me that he wanted to see his books in the hands of white kids who didn’t actually know anyone Black. And that’s been a big motivator for me: trying to remove the ignorance some readers have. Not ignorance in the sense of stupidity, but ignorance, literally: an ability to ignore anyone who looks, believes, or acts ‘different’. So, writing. Talking to kids. Working with college students and workshop attendees to encourage a more inclusive attitude. My plan is very much based on tossing a stone in the pond to create widening ripples.


How would you like to see the children’s publishing industry do its best to support our children?

I’ve seen improvements so I’m actually encouraged.

The Brown Bookshelf, We Need Diverse Books and even Black Lives Matter have had a significant impact on publishers.

Hiring editors, art directors, and marketing people of color will make a huge difference and I’ve seen initiatives to do just that. But one of the HUGEST things publishers could do is to widen the focus in their marketing. More authors, illustrators and publishing employees of color is a great start. But until books featuring diverse characters are actively marketed to mainstream audiences, diverse books will stay a niche section of the bookstore and a niche in publishers’ marketing plans. There still doesn’t seem to be a push to market books to EVERYONE, regardless of who is on the cover.


What’s New with The Brown Bookshelf

May 1, 2017

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The Brown Bookshelf presented at the Texas Library Association conference. Thank you to the Black Caucus of TLA who sponsored our session, Overlooked Books who hosted our signing and amazing librarians like the ones from Houston in the picture who showed us lots of love.

Thank you to everyone who supports the work we do. Completing our 10th 28 Days Later campaign was a special milestone for us. We appreciated the shares, comments and kudos. It’s an honor to raise awareness of the wonderful black children’s book creators that give kids stories that showcase their experiences, history, adventures and dreams.

Last month, we took our show on the road, presenting at the Texas Library Association conference. We received such a warm reception from librarians who said they plan to add books by authors and illustrators we highlighted to their collections. In November, we’ll present at the American Association of School Librarians conference in Phoenix. Our mission is to celebrate others, so we don’t often talk about ourselves. But so many exciting things are happening that we wanted to give you a peek into what’s new in our world. We are grateful for the commitment of people like you who help push for change. All kids deserve to see themselves as the stars of stories and as book creators.

TeachingBooks.net

Special thanks to Nick Glass and Carin Bringelson for helping our work reach more readers and creating such an important resource.

28dayslogoTeachingBooks.net has created a list that showcases our 10 years of 28 Days Later features and additional resources they’ve compiled for our honorees. Here’s the full list which is available without subscription to their service this year and will be accessible without subscription every February in perpetuity. In addition, each year they will make a list for our new class of 28 Days Later honorees with links to our spotlights and extra resources which will remain free until the end of that year. Here’s the list for the authors and illustrators celebrated in our 2017 campaign. Want resources for members of our team? TeachingBooks.net has a list for that too.

Note: Our 28 Days Later spotlights are always available on our blog. You can use the 28 Days Later tab on our menu bar for links to author and illustrators featured each year or the search box in the right column to find a post about a particular children’s book creator.

Highlights Foundation Scholarship

Special thanks to Kent Brown and Alison Myers for the chance to help make a difference. Here’s the announcement from Alison:

Congratulations, Andrea Loney! Andrea (and her sweet Bunnybear) were bunnybearpicnominated by The Brown Bookshelf to attend Crafting Successful Author Visits next month at the Highlights Foundation. During the workshop Andrea will present to a local school. To have Andrea visit your school please go to: http://andreajloney.com/school-visits/ 

The Brown Bookshelf will nominate a children’s book author or illustrator for a 2018 Highlights Foundation workshop of the honoree’s choosing. Look for details about this exciting opportunity in the near future.

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Here’s the skinny on members of our team:

Gwendolyn Hooks

civilrightsMy latest book is If You Were A Kid During The Civil Rights Movement illustrated by Kelly Kennedy (Scholastic Library). Later this spring, Music Time and Block Party will be released by Lee & Low Books. Both are illustrated by Shirley Ng-Benitez and Block Party is a Junior Library Guild Section. Tiny Stitches – The Life of Medical Pioneer Vivien Thomas won the NAACP IMAGE Award for Outstanding Literary Work-Children. Illustrator, Colin Bootman and I are honored to have our collaboration recognized. Now, it’s a new year and I’m re-reading The Brown Bookshelf’s 28 Days Later 2017 campaign for inspiration. Those authors and illustrators inspire me to re-think some projects and move forward on others. A writer’s work is never done!

To learn more about Gwendolyn, visit http://www.gwendolynhooks.com.

Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich

I’m working on And Two Naomis Too (Balzer and Bray/HarperCollins) with Audrey TwoNaomis_jkt-193x300Vernick, which will be out in 2018. I’ll be appearing at nerdCampNJ in May, the Maplewood-South Orange Book Festival in June, and NCTE in November. This summer, I’ll be working on some new manuscripts; I’m looking forward to participating in Teachers Write again, meeting and working with the new class of WNDB Internship Grant Award recipients, and finishing some languishing craft projects.

To learn more about Olugbemisola, visit http://www.olugbemisolabooks.com.

Don Tate
My forthcoming project is a picture book biography about Victorian strongman Eugen Sandow, also known as the “Father of Bodybuilding.” STRONG AS SANDOW: HOW EUGEN SANDOW BECAME THE STRONGEST MAN ON EARTH (Charlesbridge, Aug. 2017).

sandowInspired by my own experiences in the sport of body-building, I tell the story of how Eugen Sandow changed the way people think about exercise and physical fitness. I will be signing STRONG AS SANDOW at BookExpo America on June 2nd, 2017, Booth 2905 from 2:00 to 3pm.

WHOOSH! LONNIE JOHNSON’S SUPER-SOAKING STREAM OF INVENTIONS (Charlesbridge, 2016), written by Chris Barton and illustrated by me is a 2017 Children’s and Teen Choice Book Award Finalist.  Children’s Choice winners will be announced at BookExpo America, and I will be in attendance to sign books.
To learn more about Don, visit http://www.dontate.com.

Kelly Starling Lyons

jadajonesrockstarI had a wonderful time sharing at TLA. In August, I present at the National Conference of African American Librarians in Atlanta. In September, I launch my Jada Jones chapter book series – Jada Jones: Rock Star and Jada Jones: Class Act, published by Penguin Workshop and illustrated by the amazing Vanessa Brantley Newton. We’re having launch parties in Raleigh and Charlotte. Here are  Quail Ridge Books party details and Park Road Books party details. We’ll have a virtual launch too so everyone can be part of the fun.
One More Dino on the Floor is still grooving strong. Illustrator Luke Flowers and I were delighted that it was chosen for Scholastic Book Club and called a great readaloud. I’m working on new projects and enjoying meeting amazing kids and educators during author visits. Thank you for supporting my work.

To learn more about Kelly, visit http://www.kellystarlinglyons.com.

Tracey Baptiste

riseofjumbiesI’m looking forward to the release of The Jumbies sequel, Rise of the Jumbies on September 19th. In the meantime I’m working on two new book projects that have not been announced yet and a group chapter book project with some really awesome authors. I’ve also just sent in a proposal for a new nonfiction history book. Unfortunately it’s the nature of the business that I can’t be specific until all deals are finalized, so I’m going to have to be cagey for a bit!
To learn more about Tracey, visit http://www.traceybaptiste.com.

Jerry Craft

livingcolorI recently visited Jackson, Mississippi to help promote literacy among boys. With the support of COSEBOC and The Kellogg Foundation, I was joined by fellow authors David Miller, Mark C Booker, Kenneth Braswell and Ronnie Sidney II as we provided 300 eager middle school boys with 900 free books!

From there, we spoke to kids at a juvenile detention facility and addressed a crowded room at a family literacy event.

It was one of the most powerful trips I’ve even done. I signed 350 copies of my new graphic novel, Mama’s Boyz: In Living Color!

To learn more about Jerry, visit http://www.jerrycraft.net.

Crystal Allen
fame.jpgI have been extremely busy with my new series, The Magnificent Mya Tibbs!  Book one The Magnificent Mya Tibbs – Spirit Week Showdown, is on the Texas Bluebonnet list, the Grand Canyon list, Chicago Libraries best books of 2016, and Kirkus’ Best Books of 2016.  Book two, The Magnificent Mya Tibbs – The Wall of Fame Game, launched in January of this year!  I am  already scheduling author visits for the next school year, while working on my next novel titled, Between Two Brothers.
To learn more about Crystal, visit http://www.crystalallenbooks.com.

 

Tameka Fryer Brown
tamekanewbookThis past year has been filled with new literary adventures! In addition to all of the wonderful happenings occuring with BBS in this, our 10th year, I signed on with Gallt & Zacker Literary Agency, to be represented by the fierce Marietta Zacker! Almost immediately, we sold a new picture book to Joy Peskin at FSG/Macmillan (BROWN BABY LULLABY, to published in early 2019 and illustrated by AG Ford), and I finally got to meet Gwendolyn Hooks and Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich in person at ALA! And I’m expecting more good news to break over the coming months. Exclamation points are abounding in my world!
To learn more about Tameka, visit http://www.tamekafryerbrown.com.

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Paula Chase Hyman
Brown Bookshelf co-founder Paula has a two-book middle-grade deal with Greenwillow Books. Yay! The first is So Done which will debut summer 2018. She wrote this poignant post that gave an update on her writing life.

To learn more about Paula, visit http://www.paulachasehyman.com.

Varian Johnson
Brown Bookshelf co-founder Varian Johnson’s middle-grade series continue to soar. The first novel in the series, The Great Greene Heist, received two starred reviews and was named an cheatpicALA Notable Children’s Book Selection, a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year, and a Texas Library Association Lonestar List selection among other accolades. His latest caper, To Catch A Cheat, was released last year. Kirkus praised the novel in a starred review, calling it, “A satisfying stand-alone sequel; new readers and old friends will be hoping for further adventures.” Varian has also written for the Spirit Animals middle-grade fantasy series as well as novels and short stories for YA audiences.
To learn more about Varian, visit http://www.varianjohnson.com.