Day 28: Margaree King Mitchell

If you are at all familiar with the picture book genre, you’ve likely heard of Uncle Jed’s Barbershop, the much heralded, 1994 Coretta Scott King Honor Book. Margaree King Mitchell is the author of that still-popular title, as well as Granddaddy’s Gift (1996).

Her latest book, When Grandmama Sings, was released last month to wonderful reviews. As we wind down this year’s campaign, it is an honor to feature the words and work of Margaree King Mitchell.

 

The Journey

When my son was in kindergarten, his school had Grandparents Day.  Students could invite their grandparents to spend the whole day with them.  We lived in Memphis, TN at the time and my son’s grandmothers lived in Atlanta and Kansas City, so he had no one to invite to school.  When he arrived at school, not only had students brought their grandmothers, some had also brought their grandfathers.  When my son got home he was very sad.  “I don’t have any grandfathers,” he said.  I explained to him that both of his grandfathers had died before he was born.  But he didn’t understand.  Every day he came home from school sad because he had no grandfathers. I searched the public library for books that would show what life was like for his ancestors. I couldn’t find any.  Then I went to all the bookstores in town.  I still couldn’t find any.  Therefore, I decided to write the books myself.

I wanted the books to be set in the rural South because that is where I’m from.  I grew up on my grandfather’s farm in Holly Springs, Mississippi. I wanted each book to focus on an ordinary person who does extraordinary things for the time period in which they lived. I patterned the Uncle Jed character in my first book, UNCLE JED’S BARBERSHOP, after my grandfather.  My grandfather owned his own farm during a time of segregation and racial discrimination.  And he showed me that a person can rise above their surroundings and make their dreams come true.

I wanted to show the same things in my books.  As I was thinking about my first book, I remembered my grandfather telling me about a barber who went house to house cutting hair. I made Uncle Jed a barber because I wanted all children to identify with the character whether they lived in the city or a small town. By the time I began writing the book we had moved to Little Rock, Arkansas. One day my son’s first grade teacher asked me to help out with some of the kids in her class who were behind the other kids academically.   I started volunteering three days a week and worked with five students.  Those three days turned into four days, then five days.  I really cared about the students and wanted them to do well in school.  When the end of the school year came, I wondered what would become of students who had no one to believe in them.  Then I realized that the book I was writing to teach my son about his ancestors could also inspire children to dream big dreams for their lives.

After submitting my story for two years I received nothing but rejection letters.  However, they were personal rejection letters from editors telling me that they loved my story but it didn’t fit in with their publishing plans.  Finally, frustrated that those editors could love my story and not publish it, I decided to submit it directly to the publisher of Simon & Schuster.  Within a month I had a contract.

When UNCLE JED’S BARBERSHOP was published, I was asked to read the story during Story Time at the main branch of the Little Rock Public Library.  This was the first time kids other than my son had heard the story so I was anxious to see their reaction.  After I finished reading the book, parents who were fascinated by the historical aspects of the story dominated the question and answer period.  And I didn’t get any comments from children.  But as I was leaving a little girl was waiting for me by the door.  She said, “I liked your story about Uncle Jed.  I want to be a doctor when I grow up but my grandmama keeps telling me I’ll never be one.  Now I know I can be a doctor.”

I knew then I had achieved my goal in writing UNCLE JED’S BARBERSHOP.  Since that day I have received many letters from children all across the country telling me their dreams.   They also tell me who says they can’t achieve their dreams and why.  But because of Uncle Jed’s story, they now know they can be anything they want to be if they just don’t give up.

 

The Inspiration

I get ideas for my stories on my morning walks.  When my mind is quiet and I’m surrounded by nature ideas come to me.  If I’m stuck at a certain part in a story I put it aside until the next day.  I know that the next morning while I’m walking and appreciating nature the right solution will come.

I’m inspired by stories that are populated by families and friends, the stuff of life.  I especially love the books of Mildred D. Taylor, whose stories are inspired by her family and their experiences.   She heard about many of these stories at family gatherings in Mississippi.  Her book ROLL OF THUNDER, HEAR MY CRY, is set in 1933 Mississippi during the Great Depression and deals with racial injustice.  Her stories are filled with characters who find a way to right wrongs done to them.

 

The Back Story

My agent placed WHEN GRANDMAMA SINGS with Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, a division of William Morrow and Company.  WHEN GRANDMAMA SINGS was the third book she had placed with them.  However, before the first book came out, HarperCollins purchased William Morrow and Company.  Therefore, HarperCollins inherited all three books.   After a review of my books, it was decided that WHEN GRANDMAMA SINGS would be published first.  So I have waited over ten years for WHEN GRANDMAMA SINGS to be published.

However, during those ten years lots of great things happened with UNCLE JED’S BARBERSHOP.  They are too numerous to name.  I’ll just mention a few.  An award winning musical featuring Broadway veteran Ken Prymus has been adapted from UNCLE JED’S BARBERSHOP.  The most recent performances were in Denver last year.  Plans are being made to take it to additional theaters.

The Federal Reserve Bank has developed lesson plans using UNCLE JED’S BARBERSHOP to teach students about saving, savings goals, opportunity cost, and entrepreneurship.

The Library of Congress has developed a lesson plan connecting events in history to the story in UNCLE JED’S BARBERSHOP.

 

The Buzz

From School Library Journal:

Gr-2-4 – Set in the segregated South of the 1950s, Mitchell’s poignant story features eight-year old Belle and her loving, stalwart African-American family. When Grandmama, who can’t read but whose singing voice captures the hearts of all who hear her, joins a jazz band for a tour of the South, Belle pleads to go along. Thrilled to expand her world beyond Pecan Flats, MS, she experiences firsthand the difficulties her people face: hotels marked “White Only,” diners that refuse them service, police who search their cars and luggage for no reason. Through it all, Grandmama sings to growing crowds, believing in the power of music to bring people together. When, at the story’s end, a recording contract beckons her “up north,” Grandmama tells Belle to believe in herself and “sing her own song.” Ransome’s full-page images, rich in color and feeling, portray the landscape of the South and the individual emotions of the characters with equal aplomb. Placed in the past, the message is still relevant for children today.” (Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA

From Kirkus Reviews:

Belle joins her beloved grandmother, a jazz singer, on a summer tour of Southern towns and sees that segregation is everywhere—not just at home in Mississippi.

Holding tight to her uncle’s lucky rabbit’s foot, Belle watches as Grandmama and the musicians face the ugliness of Jim Crow in diners and theaters and on the road. In Alabama, the police dump their belongings on the roadside, a state’s welcome. She also listens as her grandmother shares her dreams for an integrated society and thrills to her resounding performance on stage in Atlanta, one that leads to an offer to make recordings for a company up North. It’s a moment that inspires Belle to dream, because “the promise of her song helped me believe in myself.” As in Uncle Jed’s Barbershop (1993), for which Ransome won a Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor, Mitchell has crafted another compelling story of an African-American family both strong and determined despite the all-powerful clamp of racism. Ransome uses watercolors in warm tones of yellows and browns to reveal nuances of expression and the warmth of family and community.

A gentle story that shows the everyday realities of segregation through the observant eye of a child. (Picture book. 5-9)

From Publishers Weekly:

“Mitchell and Ransome, the team behind Coretta Scott King Honor–winner Uncle Jed’s Barbershop, reunite for another story set in the early 20th century, in which intimate family relationships are set against a backdrop of racial segregation. Eight-year-old narrator Belle lives with her parents and Grandmama in the fictional town of Pecan Flats, Miss. Grandmama’s singing voice has earned her local fame, and when a man offers to “book her and a band on a small singing tour of the South,” she agrees, bringing Belle along for the ride. Written in the past tense, Belle’s narration has an elegiac quality, but while the band encounters plenty of discrimination on the road, triumphs outweigh setbacks (and Grandmama doesn’t come to any serious harm). Ransome’s lovely, naturalistic watercolors draw out a wealth of emotions from the characters, particularly Grandmama, whose expressions range from weariness to passion while she’s singing, and determination, such as when she slams money on the counter of a restaurant that won’t serve them. It’s a stirring reminder that it’s never too late to chase one’s dreams, no matter the obstacles. Ages 5–9. (Jan.)”

From The Horn Book:

From the author and the illustrator of Uncle Jed’s Barbershop (rev. 11/93) comes another picture book about life in the segregated South. The narrator recounts her grandmother’s story—she couldn’t read but “always had a song to sing”—which centers on Grandmama’s singing tour with her eight-year-old granddaughter there to keenly observe everything. Grandmama and her musicians initially draw small crowds, and Belle nervously points out the “whites only” signs wherever they go, but Grandmama is undeterred. Gradually word spreads about Grandmama’s talent as the tour continues, but the group still must contend with suspicion from Alabama police. The narration is calm and matter-of-fact, like Grandmama, who remains focused on what’s right, while in contrast Ransome’s paintings show the shame, sadness, and anger the characters feel. Mitchell’s latest picture book gives modern-day children a realistic depiction of the small humiliations and frightening moments African American travelers went through in their daily lives during the Jim Crow era, and it makes an excellent book for discussion. susan dove lempke

From Elizabeth Bird’s Librarian Preview:

Remember Uncle Jed’s Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell, and illustrated by James Ransome?  I sure as heck do because that book ends up on a lot of school lists of required reading.  Well, that book came out in 1993 and is still in print to this day.  Now Mitchell and Ransome have reunited at long last in When Grandmama Sings.  In this picture book (historical) a girl can read and her grandma can’t.  When her grandmother’s singing gives her a chance to go on tour she does so with her granddaughter.  The trouble?  They’re touring the segregated south.  This is a book that covers both a meaningful relationship and history.  A good companion to last year’s The Green Book by Calvin Ramsey and Floyd Cooper, don’t you think?

 

The State of the Industry

Publishers should remember that there is a whole market of underserved readers who are interested in stories of the South and other stories featuring the African American experience.     There are a myriad of stories about African American life waiting to be told but if traditional publishers are not interested in these stories the literary record will be incomplete. The South is filled with rich history of how African Americans overcame racial obstacles to not only survive but thrive and be successful under unbearable conditions.  This is why ordinary people are at the center of my stories. By telling those stories students will realize that they, too, can make a difference in the world.

Regardless of how well previous books by authors of color are received, there is still someone who says no one will read your book.  Or the book has to be about a famous African American.  Or the person reading the story has no grasp of history and doesn’t believe that ordinary African Americans could be resourceful and create their own destiny.  Therefore, it is hard for new books to be published.  And it will continue to be so unless there is an advocate in publishing companies who is committed to being sure that all stories are told.

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2 Responses to Day 28: Margaree King Mitchell

  1. tadmack says:

    People every year start talking “awards” earlier and earlier… but When Grandmama Sings has all of the earmarks of a winner. It tells the facts, but the relationship sings out above it all, and sweetens and softens hard reality. It sounds beautiful.

    And the author is correct: ordinary people at the center of our stories means that an ordinary child learns that they can live an extraordinary life. Write on, Ms. Mitchell.

  2. Lisa says:

    I read and enjoyed When Grandmama Sings, but didn’t know of Uncle Jed’s Barbershop, I will seek it out today. The ability to inspire is such a gift. Thanks for sharing.

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