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26 Responses to Blog

  1. Dear Brown Bookshelf:

    Betsy Bird, a children’s book reviewer who works in the Children’s Center of the New York Public Library, referred me to you.

    I’m an author with a new YA book coming out this October. Ugly To Start With is a collection of short stories being published by West Virginia University Press. The 13 stories–about growing up in The Mountain State–have all been published in good literary journals, including The Iowa Review.

    My short stories have appeared in more than seventy-five literary journals, including North American Review, The Kenyon Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, and The Chattahoochee Review. Twice I have been nominated for The Pushcart Prize. My short story “The Scratchboard Project” received an honorable mention in The Best American Short Stories 2007.

    I am also the author of the nationally acclaimed coming-of-age novel The Night I Freed John Brown (Philomel Books, Penguin Group, 2009), winner of The Paterson Prize for Books for Young Readers (Grades 7-12) and one of ten books recommended by USA TODAY for Black History Month. Rave reviews include Kirkus Reviews, The Boston Globe, The Buffalo News, and BookPage, along with award-winning literary magazines Mid-American Review, Black Warrior Review, and The Texas Review.

    Can I talk you into reviewing my collection, Ugly To Start With? I’d be very grateful. If you email me back, I’ll send you a professional-grade PDF of my collection for your consideration.

    I’m confident you’ll enjoy my stories.

    Thank you, and I look forward to hearing back from you.

    Kindly,

    John Michael Cummings

  2. From Where Do We Come is not a story about slavery. It’s a children’s book about Life- a guide to survival. It’s a reminder that we have what it takes to get through any situation in life. By holding onto our Faith- that unwavering belief that the Creator is in full control and He makes no mistakes so trust Him. By remaining Resilient- our ability to bounce back from any situation we find ourselves in. By being bold enough to use our own Minds to think for ourselves, to interpret situations free from others’ influence/agenda, and to turn negatives into positives. Finally, by keeping Family bonds tight. Not just biological family- with any and all persons who share our core values and beliefs. There is Strength in numbers- necessary for praying together and taking care of the Village. If we can make it through slavery, we can make it through any situation that comes our way. We already have it in us- From Where Do We Come (simply put) aims to celebrate that fact.

    “From Where Do We Come?” was inspired by a conversation I had with my children last year. My son was a 2nd grader at the time, when he came home with a question about slavery. Interestingly enough, that very same day I had just had a conver…sation with my dad on the subject, and had not decided on an approach for
    having discussions about race with my children. In addition, I was trying to determine the appropriate age for addressing the issue but still wasn’t clear about its degree of necessity. Well, that dilemma would become a non-factor as my son (and subsequently my daughter) began bombarding me with questions.

    “From Where Do We Come?” in essence, captures the inevitable conversation I had with my children on that very day. Here are the important take-aways from the discussion: Schools begin teaching our children about slavery as early as 1st grade, which I learned from my daughter. It leaves children, black children in particular, with many questions about their identity and their place in the world. As much as we may not see the benefit(s) in revisiting a very painful part of our history, it’s very necessary. Fortunately for me, I was able to address my children’s questions & concerns using an age-appropriate approach, and I (hopefully) relieved them of the emotional burden they may have otherwise carried for years, if not their entire lives. What burden you ask? The burden of feeling like we as black people must’ve done something wrong to have been taken as slaves in the first place. The weight of feeling like we must be responsible for making white people want to treat us that way. The burden of not wanting to be black because look what happens to black people. The burden of why us? The burden of am I good enough? The burden of being angry and thinking somebody owes me something because of what happened to my ancestors.

    While these are certainly valid thoughts & feelings, they are self-defeating. As parents, it is our responsibility to comfort our children and to help them make sense of the world around them- even when it makes us uncomfortable. School history lessons don’t address any of the questions/concerns/EMOTIONS this piece of history stirs up in our children. “From Where Do We Come?” does not revisit our past for the sake of conjuring old unwanted feelings. It does not blame anyone nor does it focus on the harsh realities of slavery. The story addresses the important take-aways worthy of celebrating that came out of this particular chapter in our history. It simply reaches back in time (from Africa to Slavery to Now) to re-tell our story, in an EMPOWERING way, of how we have come to be African-Americans.

    “Development of a child’s self-image is perhaps the most important barometer of future success.” Self-worth and self-esteem are important beliefs for empowering oneself. A valid sense of self-worth is necessary in order to attain joy, peace, love, and control of one’s own life. It is what enables us to believe that we are capable of doing our best with our talents, of contributing well in society, and that we deserve to lead a fulfilling life.

    After our discussion, my son was asked how he felt. His response: “I feel proud.” My daughter’s response was very similar, and she asked the most questions- although she couldn’t comprehend the subject matter as well as my son. It was at this very moment that I knew a book was born.

  3. jtetter25 says:

    Dear Brown Bookshelf,

    I would like to nominate myself for th 28 Days Later campaign. My name is Jamilah, and I am an author of an inspirational children’s book, From Where Do We Come.

    From Where Do We Come is not a story about slavery. It’s a children’s book about Life- a guide to survival. It’s a reminder that we have what it takes to get through any situation in life. By holding onto our Faith- that unwavering belief that the Creator is in full control and He makes no mistakes so trust Him. By remaining Resilient- our ability to bounce back from any situation we find ourselves in. By being bold enough to use our own Minds to think for ourselves, to interpret situations free from others’ influence/agenda, and to turn negatives into positives. Finally, by keeping Family bonds tight. Not just biological family- with any and all persons who share our core values and beliefs. There is Strength in numbers- necessary for praying together and taking care of the Village. If we can make it through slavery, we can make it through any situation that comes our way. We already have it in us- From Where Do We Come (simply put) aims to celebrate that fact.

    “From Where Do We Come?” was inspired by a conversation I had with my children last year. My son was a 2nd grader at the time, when he came home with a question about slavery. Interestingly enough, that very same day I had just had a conver…sation with my dad on the subject, and had not decided on an approach for
    having discussions about race with my children. In addition, I was trying to determine the appropriate age for addressing the issue but still wasn’t clear about its degree of necessity. Well, that dilemma would become a non-factor as my son (and subsequently my daughter) began bombarding me with questions.

    “From Where Do We Come?” in essence, captures the inevitable conversation I had with my children on that very day. Here are the important take-aways from the discussion: Schools begin teaching our children about slavery as early as 1st grade, which I learned from my daughter. It leaves children, black children in particular, with many questions about their identity and their place in the world. As much as we may not see the benefit(s) in revisiting a very painful part of our history, it’s very necessary. Fortunately for me, I was able to address my children’s questions & concerns using an age-appropriate approach, and I (hopefully) relieved them of the emotional burden they may have otherwise carried for years, if not their entire lives. What burden you ask? The burden of feeling like we as black people must’ve done something wrong to have been taken as slaves in the first place. The weight of feeling like we must be responsible for making white people want to treat us that way. The burden of not wanting to be black because look what happens to black people. The burden of why us? The burden of am I good enough? The burden of being angry and thinking somebody owes me something because of what happened to my ancestors.

    While these are certainly valid thoughts & feelings, they are self-defeating. As parents, it is our responsibility to comfort our children and to help them make sense of the world around them- even when it makes us uncomfortable. School history lessons don’t address any of the questions/concerns/EMOTIONS this piece of history stirs up in our children. “From Where Do We Come?” does not revisit our past for the sake of conjuring old unwanted feelings. It does not blame anyone nor does it focus on the harsh realities of slavery. The story addresses the important take-aways worthy of celebrating that came out of this particular chapter in our history. It simply reaches back in time (from Africa to Slavery to Now) to re-tell our story, in an EMPOWERING way, of how we have come to be African-Americans.

    “Development of a child’s self-image is perhaps the most important barometer of future success.” Self-worth and self-esteem are important beliefs for empowering oneself. A valid sense of self-worth is necessary in order to attain joy, peace, love, and control of one’s own life. It is what enables us to believe that we are capable of doing our best with our talents, of contributing well in society, and that we deserve to lead a fulfilling life.

    After our discussion, my son was asked how he felt. His response: “I feel proud.” My daughter’s response was very similar, and she asked the most questions- although she couldn’t comprehend the subject matter as well as my son. It was at this very moment that I knew a book was born.

  4. I would like to nominate “Legend of the Mantamaji, Book One” by critically-acclaimed television director Eric Dean Seaton, released October 8th.

    His graphic novel series is timely, compelling and important. Children of all races need to see people of color in the role of ‘superhero.’ It does children a disservice to see that only white males can save the world and it is particularly egregious that people of color are written out of the future in science fiction. What Seaton does in book one and throughout the LOTM series is create characters that are engaging and a story line that leaves readers on the edge of their seats.

    Seaton’s work has been rated ‘ON!’ by Common Sense Media, was the only independent publisher featured as a 2014 San Diego Comic-Con Exclusive and was the only black superhero graphic novel at New York Comic Con.

    From the website:

    Television director Eric Dean Seaton’s first graphic novel series is a tale exploding with brilliant art, action-packed adventure, true-to-life
    characters and a smart and twisting plotline. Published by “And…Action!” Entertainment, Legend of the Mantamaji tells the story of Elijah Alexander, a rising Assistant District Attorney in New York who learns he is the last of a race of mystical knights called the Mantamaji, who once protected mankind.

    When an ancient evil is resurrected, Elijah has to turn his back on everything he’s worked for, accept his birthright and learn how to use his magical warrior abilities to defeat the greatest threat the Mantamaji ever faced.

    The books features artwork by Brandon Palas, colorist Andrew
    Dalhouse who has worked with From Boom, Dark Horse, Image,
    Marvel and DC and lettering by Deron Bennett, who was nominated
    for an Eisner Award two years ago for his work on titles like Jim
    Henson’s Dark Crystal, Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand and Helldorado,
    among others.

    Book One is set for release on October 8th, with release dates for book two and three scheduled for December 10, 2014 and February 11, 2015, respectively.

    About Eric Dean Seaton:

    As an episodic director, Eric Dean Seaton is a two-time NAACP Image Award nominee and has helmed over 38 different shows, 195 episodes of television, 18 music videos, two pilots for Nickelodeon, “Bad Fairy,” and “Sketch,” as well as two pilots for Disney XD, “Mighty Med,” which currently shooting its second season and “Kickin’ It,” which has completed its four year run.

    Eric has also directed episodes of NBC/Warner Bros. comedy
    “Undateable,” BET’s “Let’s Stay Together,” as well as direct the pilot
    and co-executive produce the Starz Kids and Family Channel and
    international hit, “The Wannabes Starring Savvy.”

    He is a two-time NAACP Image Award nominee for Best Directing in a Comedy Series and the 2014 winner of the Samella Lewis Award for Professional Achievement from The Ohio State University.

    http://LegendoftheMantamaji.com
    http://EricDeanSeaton.com

  5. terreecemclarke says:

    I would like to nominate “Legend of the Mantamaji, Book One” by critically-acclaimed television director Eric Dean Seaton, released October 8th.

    His graphic novel series is timely, compelling and important. Children of all races need to see people of color in the role of ‘superhero.’ It does children a disservice to see that only white males can save the world and it is particularly egregious that people of color are written out of the future in science fiction. What Seaton does in book one and throughout the LOTM series is create characters that are engaging and a story line that leaves readers on the edge of their seats.

    Seaton’s work has been rated ‘ON!’ by Common Sense Media, was the only independent publisher featured as a 2014 San Diego Comic-Con Exclusive and was the only black superhero graphic novel at New York Comic Con.

    From the website:

    Television director Eric Dean Seaton’s first graphic novel series is a tale exploding with brilliant art, action-packed adventure, true-to-life
    characters and a smart and twisting plotline. Published by “And…Action!” Entertainment, Legend of the Mantamaji tells the story of Elijah Alexander, a rising Assistant District Attorney in New York who learns he is the last of a race of mystical knights called the Mantamaji, who once protected mankind.

    When an ancient evil is resurrected, Elijah has to turn his back on everything he’s worked for, accept his birthright and learn how to use his magical warrior abilities to defeat the greatest threat the Mantamaji ever faced.

    The books features artwork by Brandon Palas, colorist Andrew
    Dalhouse who has worked with From Boom, Dark Horse, Image,
    Marvel and DC and lettering by Deron Bennett, who was nominated
    for an Eisner Award two years ago for his work on titles like Jim
    Henson’s Dark Crystal, Jim Henson’s Tale of Sand and Helldorado,
    among others.

    Book One is set for release on October 8th, with release dates for book two and three scheduled for December 10, 2014 and February 11, 2015, respectively.

    About Eric Dean Seaton:

    As an episodic director, Eric Dean Seaton is a two-time NAACP Image Award nominee and has helmed over 38 different shows, 195 episodes of television, 18 music videos, two pilots for Nickelodeon, “Bad Fairy,” and “Sketch,” as well as two pilots for Disney XD, “Mighty Med,” which currently shooting its second season and “Kickin’ It,” which has completed its four year run.

    Eric has also directed episodes of NBC/Warner Bros. comedy
    “Undateable,” BET’s “Let’s Stay Together,” as well as direct the pilot
    and co-executive produce the Starz Kids and Family Channel and
    international hit, “The Wannabes Starring Savvy.”

    He is a two-time NAACP Image Award nominee for Best Directing in a Comedy Series and the 2014 winner of the Samella Lewis Award for Professional Achievement from The Ohio State University.

    http://LegendoftheMantamaji.com

    http://EricDeanSeaton.com

  6. Dear Brown Book Shelf,

    I would like to nominate A World Of Our Own:The Beginning.

    After having our first child in 2007 we searched and searched for positive media choices with images possessing our own likenesses. We had some amazing finds but noticed that our options for faith based books were extremely limited. We asked ourselves, “What can we do about it?” Our careers were beginning to take off, so the task of creating a book would have to be tabled until the correct opportunity availed itself.

    In 2012, that opportunity presented itself by way of a conversation. We were sitting in our living room discussing the lack of media choices for our now three children. Our Bible was sitting on the coffee table. We both said almost in unison, “Let’s write a book about God’s creation!” After brewing a pot of coffee and working for about an hour, we had developed a rough draft for what would become our first publication.

    It’s been 2 years in the making and our labor of love is finally done!

    A World of Our Own: The Beginning beautifully illustrates the first 7 days of God’s creation. Children of all ages will enjoy its rhythmic word play and be captivated by its creative essence. So… parents, grandparents, teachers, pastors, aunts, uncles, cousins, friends etc. presenting the first book in the A World of Our Own series…The Beginning.

    For more updates, information about our book, please visit;

    http://www.ourstorybookspublishing.com

    http://www.facebook.com/ourstorybookspublishing

    Thanks!

    Omar and Kimberly Finley

  7. James Gordon says:

    Hello, my name is James Gordon. I am the author of the DJ Gatsby Book Club Children’s Book of the Year “Hi My Name is Bobo” (A Weekend in the Life of a 5th Grader). I’d like to nominate it for your 28 Days Later feature. Here’s is the latest review of Bobo.

    1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
    5A slice of life
    ByStorywraps “Marilyn”on February 10, 2015
    Format: Kindle Edition
    Can you remember “back in the day” when life was simple, donuts were a celebration, and Saturday morning was reserved for all-morning cartoon viewing? Well this wonderful, heartwarming book will provide a trip down memory lane and a jumping off point to converse with your child as to how your childhood was spent as opposed to his present day one.

    James Gordon documents a typical weekend in the life of a 5th grader. Bobo and his brother Smiley are immersed in viewing television shows that the whole family rallied around, sibling rivalry (and camaraderie ) at its best, scrumptious food that mom prepared, and of course, going to church as a family on Sunday. He unwraps a nostalgic, slice of life that takes you back to the 70’s and highlights how kids were allowed to be kids and how they revelled in the importance of family relationships and what made them happy at that time.

    The inserted photos are a great addition to the narrative and the fact that the main character is an African American boy is a very important component to the book, as the picture book industry seems to be lacking in that area. I highly recommend this book.

  8. Dear Brown Bookshelf,

    My name is Kesha Russaw Rushing and I would like to nominate my book, Terrell and Keke’s Adventures Through Time “Traveling the Underground Railroad”, for the 28 Days later feature. I wrote this first edition to show our children as leads in an adventure time travel series. I feel that is important for our children to have leading characters that they can relate to while exposing them to exciting learning adventures throughout time and the world. Here is a little about the book:

    Eleven-year-old Terrell and his 8 year-old sister, Keke, are time-travelers. Only they don’t know it yet. All they know is it’s the end of the school year, their parents are having financial troubles and they must leave their friends in Chicago to spend the summer with their grandparents in small-town Tennessee. An entire summer with a sassy, annoying little sister following his every step?! This may be Terrell’s most boring summer ever. Or, will it? The woods behind his grandparents’ house are deep, dark and forbidden – the perfect place for an adventure. The pair discover a hidden cabin and a trunk full of books that will lead them on a whirlwind adventure through time. Their first stop? The Underground Railroad led by the famous abolitionist, Harriet Tubman. On their journey they will travel as runaways and experience the danger, fear and courage that many slaves experienced on their journey to freedom.

    Terrell & Keke’s Adventures Through Time is a spell-binding series that transports readers to world events from the past and future. Travel with this brother and sister as they learn more about history, and themselves, on their journeys around the globe.

    This 132 page middle grade book with illustrations throughout will be released on Nov 15th.

    For updates please visit FB page and website soon to come!

    http://www.facebook.com/AdventuresThroughTime

    • Sebastian Rice says:

      This sounds like a fantastic book for not only African American children but all children. The idea behind them being time travelers is very interesting and appealing. I can’t wait for a finished product.

  9. Tawanna Johnson says:

    Hello! My name is Tawanna Johnson. I am a young African American female licensed Mortician, currently in 3 states. Based on my career and my daughters, I have written a children’s book. Also with the book I want to include a separate book that is a coloring and activity book.

    I believe that this book can help young readers understand what most are afraid to talk about, DEATH. This book can shed some light on Morticians as a career and the services we provide to the public. Also, the Funeral Service Industry has changed drastically. It’s more women entering the industry every year. We as women should be recognized for being leaders in what used to be a predominantly male industry.

    With all of that being said, these book(s) will help our youth through the grieving process.

    Thank you for your time and consideration.

    Tawanna

  10. Dear Brownbookshelf,

    Have you ever looked off into the heavens and night and wondered what your place in the world, and the universe is?

    Meet Adanna, A 10-year-old island girl with the rich autograph of the sun in her skin and the stars in her eyes. She has the same questions, and luckily, she gets answered for all of us!! She is an avid stargazer with career aspirations in space. She is a daddy’s girl and prides her love for astronomy on his genius teaching. But when daddy mysteriously disappears at sea her entire world changes! It is not until she takes a journey beyond space and time, that she finds a truth like no other.
    My name is Dale Wells-Marshall, and I’ve recently published a full color, first chapter book, in which a girl of the African diaspora is the main character in a science fiction book! Superstar Me: Adanna and the Dog Star is a book that I am excited to present to the world at a time in the universe that is just right for children to accept their universal calling to be all that they are.
    The book is so multidimensional that it involves the loss of a parent, body image issues, teasing/bullying, extended family dynamic, astronomy, and universal truth!! Amazing!
    I’m very humbled by it, but oh so excited that this story chose me to write it!
    You can find out more about what happens to Adanna and her dad, at http://www.starinspiredbooks.com to watch the book trailer or check it out on Amazon.com where it is available for pre-order also on Kindle.
    I nominate this book- SuperStar Me: Adanna and the Dog Star !!

  11. Gowon Fisher says:

    Dear Brownbookshelf,

    My name is Gowon Fisher, and I am a beginning children’s book author. I have just written, illustrated, and self-published two books. I am now working on the arduous process of getting my book recognized. Any input that the seasoned writers on this blog can provide for me, would be greatly appreciated. I would also appreciate hearing some opinions on my books. My website is gmfbooks.com. Thank you for your time.

    Sincerely,

    Gowon Fisher

  12. Lori Baker says:

    I would like to submit a manuscript for the 28Days Initiative. The work is: The Spirit of Giving- The Gift of Love by Holli and Lori Baker (Amazon.com). Please advise.

  13. Dear Brown Bookshelf,
    My author name is M. Ann Machen Pritchard. I am one of the 50 Great Writers You Should Be Reading from 2013-14. Here is a press release to learn more about me. http://bit.ly/1hz4JDA. My web site is http://www.cafepress.com/mampcreations. I have published two children’s books, Phil the Pill and Friends Making Positive Choices and Val’s World Featuring The Family Unity Roundtable. They were written to help encourage young children to stay in school to get a good education, learn how to read, make positive choices and learn positive communication skills. Also,to help bring families closer together.

  14. Sandra Reed says:

    Please check out my fiction novel Buckwheat’s Journey with SCBWI Book Launch Party.

    http://www.scbwi.org/display-book-launch-party/?id=362384

  15. Dr P Allen says:

    I discovered this site because it was referenced in some’s Facebook comment. What a great find! I am excited to learn about the books you review and recommend. This is so helpful.

  16. Jodi Gilmour says:

    I would like to nominate the Za and Zoey Books
    http://www.zaandzoeybooks.com/index.html

    The Za and Zoey series features two main characters, Za and Zoey, Sisters aged 9 and 8 who explore tasty recipes as they travel the world where they may be found touring the kitchens of a busy bakery asking questions about what it takes to make the perfect cupcakes :-
    · strolling through traditional English fish and chips shop or
    · working alongside a Chinese cook fashioning all sorts of dim sun with nimble fingers or
    · Traveling to a tailgating party at which an informal meal is served from the back of a parked vehicle, typically in the parking lot of a sports stadium or
    · Travelling to farmers markets and to farms to discover how milk is made.
    · The exciting adventures are endless
    The series will delight five to ten year old readers and their parents . The tv series will be filled with easy to make recipes and geared towards children of all ages and the everyday home cook – parents and care givers who are our other audience and who we hope to entertain too.
    The different book installments feature a variety of cuisines as the two sisters travel around the world.

  17. Sandra Reed says:

    Interesting concept!

  18. Ines Bustos says:

    I would like to nominate the Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo children’s book series http://www.drdeedeedynamo.com

    Dr. Dee Dee Dyanamo’s Mission to Pluto – When Gordon the Gullible Globe sounds the alarm that a sad Pluto was downgraded to a dwarf planet, Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo is positive that she can use her surgical skills to help him. Join Dr. Dee Dee as she rallies her team and jets through the galaxy in Freeda the Flying Ambulance to perform surgery on Pluto. Will Pluto become a planet again?

    Dr. Dee Dee Dyanamo’s Meteorite Mission – Asteroids, meteoroids, meteors, meteorites—What in the world! Gordon the Gullible Globe hears Astrid Asteroid wailing because a piece of her rock has broken off, followed shortly by a loud BOOM! Matty Meteorite has collided with Earth and there is trouble. Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo and her team whisk off in Freeda the Flying Ambulance to Chelyabinsk, Russia, to repair the damage. Can Dr. Dee Dee reunite Astrid Asteroid and Matty Meteorite?

    Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo’s Saturn Surprise – The rings of Saturn go round and round, Disappeared one day and could not be found. To put them back, just take a chance, And join me in the Saturn Dance! Meet Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo- 9-year-old girl Super Surgeon on the Go. Born with supernatural powers from electrical energy, she jets around the Universe fixing problems with her gifted hands. Dr. Dee Dees, and cousin Lukass, visit to the Island of Positivity Planetarium is interrupted when Gordon the Gullible Globe sounds the alarm that Saturns rings have disappeared. Dr. Dee Dee is skeptical but mobilizes her team of assistants and instruments for a mission to Saturn. Oh boy! Is she SURPRISED when she arrives at Saturn!

    Dr. Williams has combined her love of science, medicine and public health and writing to create global impact. After completing a BA in Biophysics at Johns Hopkins University, her MD, MPH at Harvard Medical School and School of Public Health and surgical training at MGH and Lahey Clinic, She has published a series of children’s books featuring Dr. Dee Dee Dynamo-Super Surgeon on the Go, which has been embraced by children and educators across the country and various parts of the world. The goal is to build a multi-media vehicle that will touch every child. – See more at: http://www.droneeka.com

    We look forward to hearing from you.

  19. Hello, I was wondering if you might be doing the 28 Days later contest again this year or if you have something similar happening at another time of the year. I have one book out and will be putting out another this year. Here is the Amazon link to it: http://www.amazon.com/Dying-Breed-Bright-Lights/dp/1477204091/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1434472344&sr=8-1&keywords=a+dying+breed+darian+wigfall

  20. […] founded the blog  The Brown Bookshelf–increasing awareness of African American voices writing for […]

  21. I would like to nominate my chapter book series Lizzie & McKenzie’s Fabulous Adventures:Madness in Madrid. I have always enjoyed reading magical realism and wanted to see more young girls of color as protagonists exploring new worlds.  Lizzie & McKenzie’s Fabulous Adventures is about empowerment, celebrating diversity, culture with some misadventures along the way.

    
Lizzie Sanders, the pint-sized daredevil, and McKenzie Rivers, who loves all things frilly, aren’t afraid of being different. And that’s exactly why Princess Lovina of Exquisite City calls upon them to stop the Same Glam Goddess from making all the little girls of the world look the same.  With the aid of their magical lovely lockets and fierce diva weaponry, Lizzie and McKenzie will travel the world to find the Seven Crystals of Sisterhood. While on their quest around the world, they’ll meet new friends who will help them learn about other cultures and eventually form the Global Girls Squad. Their first stop in their quest is to the magical city of Madrid.

    The members of the Global Girls Squad have magical powers and celebrate and appreciate being different.  Lizzie and McKenzie will need their help to obtain the crystals before the Same Glam Goddess gets her hands on them. If the crystals are not found, little girls all over the world will remain under the spell of the Same Glam Goddess and will lose their identities forever!  Will Lizzie, McKenzie, and the Global Girls Squad be enough to find the crystals, break the spell, and stop the Same Glam Goddess?

    The book is currently available on amazon and barnesandnoble.com as well as lizzieandmckenzie.com

    Thank you
    Dina Tate

  22. Hello!

    I found you on Troy Johnson’s AALBC.com! My name is Denise Laidler and I am a writer and communication consultant who also doubles as a travel & culture writer in my spare time. I’m reaching out to find out if I might entice the () book club to consider my recently self published novel Journey to the Land of Look Behind, as a selection on your fantastic book club reading list.

    I’ve written for Essence magazine, Black Enterprise magazine and website, Huffington post and created digital content for the Jamaica Tourist Board, FedEx, the Rockefeller Foundation and other companies. My short story Where Dreams Die, an excerpt from Journey to Land of Look Behind was featured in the Caribbean Writer Vol. 27 and was awarded the anthology’s David Hough Literary Prize to a Caribbean author.

    Look forward to hearing from you!

    Best Regards,

    Denise Laidler

    Below is a brief description.

    Indigo Wade, a brilliant engineer and aspiring sculptor, is frustrated with her son-child boyfriend, Reed, pressured by her domineering mother, Lena and struggling through a fractured relationship with her distant and indifferent father, Capo. An urgent, disturbing phone call precipitates a trip to Jamaica where past memories resurface, life lessons are learned and new beginnings are started. Sage advice from her Aunt Mercie helps her deal with antagonistic siblings left to survive the wreckage of lives abandoned by a father who skillfully navigates relationships like a calculated chess grandmaster and lays bare the spiraling, wounding trajectory through their lives. Set in New Orleans and Jamaica, Journey to the Land of Look Behind is a study in how the pain of childhood trauma follows us into adulthood and into the relationships we develop there.

    Balanced on the threshold of two worlds, neither of which she fully belongs, Indigo must face questions that help her define her own truths. Who are we when stripped of easy monikers: daughter; father, sister, friend? Should she give up her promising career to pursue her dream of becoming a sculptor? Can she steer her father toward a place of redemption but at what cost?

    The setting stretches from the intoxicating bacchanal of New Orleans’ speakeasies to the green grottoes of the Jamaican countryside. Whether Caribbean, American or African, their stories – with themes of female identity, self-emancipation, abandoned or fatherless daughters – are often achingly familiar and universally relatable.

    I am a passionate, meticulous storyteller and I am convinced that an intimate story, interwoven with poignant truths and humor lighten this impactful story. More information is available on my site http://www.landoflookbehind.com. I can be contacted at laidler.denise@gmail.com

    Thank you for your consideration; I look forward to hearing from you.

    Best Regards,

    Denise Laidler

  23. Dear Brown Bookshelf,

    My name is Davil Jackson and I would like to nominate my book, “Timmy Tut and the Pyramid Adventure”, for the 28 Days later feature. This book, written by myself and James Woods, is the first edition of a series of Timmy Tut Adventures to help our children develop strategies and techniques in managing emotions, developing coping skills and overcoming stressful situations. I feel that is important for our children to have leading characters that they can relate to while exposing them to strategies and tools that will help them be successful in the classroom, with peers and adults, and in everyday life. Here is a little about the book:

    Timmy loves playing sports with friends, learning new things at school and spending quality time with his family. One day, Timmy’s family goes through a big change and his father moves out of the house. Timmy also makes some big changes, too. He now gets into trouble at school, and has become sad and quiet at home. Things are not looking good for this once happy kid.

    Then one day, his cool archaeologist uncle pays him a visit with a curious gift. It holds the magic that takes Timmy to a new land with new adventures and lessons. Timmy learns skills to help him cope with the changes in his family and within himself.
    Timmy Tut and the Pyramid Adventure is the first book of a transformative series that gives readers the opportunity to gain insight and wisdom that they can use in the present by traveling back in time to discover their roots and history of their ancestors. Timmy Tut and the Pyramid Adventure is more than a book. It is a tool box in which youth can learn more about themselves and the world around them.

    Paced at a 3rd grade reading level, this book can be easily followed by elementary children, but is also exciting enough for high school youth, while containing powerful messages for parents as well.

    Timmy Tut and The Pyramid Adventure is available on our website:

    http://www.timmytut.com

    You can contact me at princetimmytut@gmail.com

    Thank you for your consideration. I look forward to hearing from you.

    Davil Jackson

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