Day 15: Keturah A. Bobo

February 15, 2018

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Born in Toledo, Ohio with strong family roots in Detroit, Michigan, Keturah grew up with parents that instilled in her the importance of individuality and creativity.

Many of her illustrations depict empowering messages of black women and girls. Her paintings are renown for having large bold beautiful hair styles and representing an underserved, but growing, population of self-aware people within the African diaspora.

And one look at the abundance of her products online is all you’ll need to see exactly what we mean. Keturah is literally a one person shop that features everything from hand-painted denim jackets, to Tees, to prints and mugs all adorned with her beautifully rendered black women.

We asked her about her journey, her backstory and her inspiration.

These are her words:

THE JOURNEY

As an artist it is my duty to make art that inspires, uplifts, and advocates for my community. Nothing is more important in my art than this. I have been consistently working as an art entrepreneur since 2013. Creating my own body of work and doing freelance art projects ranging from logos to entire bodies of work. I was contacted by HarperCollins in 2016 and they were interested in working with me on Grace Byer’s children’s book “I am Enough.”

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THE BACKSTORY

HarperCollins was familiar with my work via social media and presented various artists to Grace and she chose my work because the intention behind my paintings so closely relates to the purpose of “I am Enough.”

THE INSPIRATION

My favorite writer by far is Toni Morrison. She has the ability to utilize words in such a visual way, I’m inspired to paint something every time I read one of her books. My favorite illustrator is probably Kadir Nelson; I love the way he alters perspectives and makes the characters he paints appear monumental. I love music and it is always apart of my creative process.


You can learn more about Keturah and see more of her work at www.arielbrands.com

 

 

 

 

 


Day 14: Tiffany D. Jackson

February 14, 2018

Tiffany D JacksonLast winter, Tiffany D. Jackson’s debut YA novel ALLEGEDLY had a lot of people talking with it’s emotionally charged story literally ripped from the courtroom. Kirkus called the novel “searing and true,” adding it “effectively joins Ava DuVernay’s documentary 13th and Michelle Alexander’s THE NEW JIM CROW (2010) to become another indictment of the penal system’s decimating power beyond its bars.” In June, we’ll be treated to a second novel, also based on a real life court case.

THE JOURNEY

TB: When did you start your writing journey?

allegedly coverTJ: My journey started when I was four! I wrote short stories for my mom, lumping random letters together to make them look like real words, and always grew frustrated when she couldn’t read them back to me. Fast forward to college, where I majored in Film and Television but still dreamed of becoming an author, working on stories during summer and winter breaks. Then in 2012, about a decade into my television career, I read of a case involving a nine-year-old being charged with murder. Fascinated, I began crafting a story that would ultimately become my debut novel, ALLEGEDLY. It took two years to polish the story, but I found an agent and landed a deal within a year and finally published in January of 2017.

TB: How do you think your background in film and television comes to play in your writing?

TJ: My background plays a crucial part in my creative process. I tend to write cinematically, meaning I treat each chapter as scenes or acts in a movie, painting pictures that can be clearly visualized. For structure, I follow Syd Field’s famous script writing “Paradigm” formula, which helps with plotting, pacing and tension building. Also, I’m used to cutting shows down to time in order to fit specific programming clocks for broadcast. This makes me a ruthless self-editor when it comes to my novels. If a scene doesn’t help to move the story forward, I trash it, no matter how pretty it is.

THE BACKSTORY

 

MondaysNotComing HCTB: Tell us about your upcoming title.

TJ: MONDAY’S NOT COMING is similar to ALLEGEDLY in that the story is loosely inspired by a real case that occurred in 2009, requiring extensive research. The story takes place in Southeast Washington D.C and deals with gentrification, mental health in the black community, and the biases of missing children. Coincidentally, I turned in my first draft a week before the story on the missing black teen girls in D.C went viral (#missingDCgirls).

But the REAL backstory I attribute to my best friend Tara. When we were in the third grade, Tara sprained her ankle and was out of school for a week. One of the worst weeks of my life! I never realized how connected we were and experienced how it felt to live without my better half. I poured those memories and feelings into every page of MNC.

THE INSPIRATION

TB: What inspired you to write?

TJ: Growing up, I was the type of girl who wanted stories that were relatable to my surroundings in Brooklyn and turned to adult novels at an early age. This inspired me to write for the type of kid that I was, in search of raw, gritty tales.

TB: Is this need for gritty tales the catalyst for choosing stories based on actual legal cases?

TJ: These two particular cases stood out and reminded me of so many unanswered questions I had as a teen. For example, I often wondered why a kid snatched and thrown in the back of a van near my elementary school was barely spoken of yet girls like Elizabeth Smart had weeks of national coverage.

I am hoping using cases will drive home the point to kids that these situations are really happening to their fellow peers. It’s not always about spoon-feeding kids lessons, it’s about putting them in another person’s shoes and letting them walk on their own, ultimately helping them to develop compassion and empathy by seeing injustice through a wider lens.

TB: What other “under the radar” African-American book creators do you want to shout out?

TJ: Liara Tamani’s CALLING MY NAME is SO stunning, poetic and beautiful. I gave five copies of it away for Christmas to friends.

TB: Liara is another one of our honorees this year, you’ll see her post on Day 20!

THE STATE OF KIDLIT

TB: What is your take on the state of the industry especially as regards African-American Kidlit?

TJ: I still consider myself quite the newbie, learning something new everyday about this industry. The good and the bad. But one thing I love about the African-American Kidlit community is the quality of the books we’re publishing, the risks and beautiful ingenuity. So although we still have a lot of work to do in order for publishing giants to respect our stories and journey, it gives me great hope that we have so much beauty to share and readers eager to receive it.

You can find Tiffany at her website, on twitter,  and Instagram.

 


Day 12: Ebony Glenn

February 12, 2018

EbonyGlennEdit Ebony Glenn is an illustrator and artist living on the quiet outskirts of Atlanta, Georgia. With an arts degree in Drawing and Painting from UNG , she aspires to bring stories to life with fanciful illustrations that are filled with whimsy and charm.

While looking through her website,  I was captivated by her  bright colorful illustrations. And somehow everything she draws seems to have a warm childlike innocence. Even the adults!  It’s no wonder that her new book, Mommy’s Khimar, has received starred reviews from Publisher’s Weekly, Kirkus, and Booklist!

While we anxiously await its release date of April 3, 2018, I was lucky enough to pick her brain on a few things. Here are her comments.

THE JOURNEY

JC: When did you start your writing journey?

EG: Ever since I was a girl, I’ve always known that I wanted to make art for a living.  Illustration has always been my solace, my way of escaping reality to an imaginary world.  Yet it wasn’t until after college that I began to explore the idea of turning this passion into a career. 

While working a part-time job in the day, I worked on my portfolio at night.   I believed in my ability to create compelling imagery for children’s books, so I sought out ways to improve my skills and gain knowledge of the publishing industry.  I studied the artwork of many successful illustrators, experimented with different artistic mediums, read plenty of books on the subject, and joined the organization SCBWI (Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators) to help me meet other like-minded folk. 

In 2016, I was fortunate enough to be approached by the Bright Agency for artistic representation, and it’s been a blessing ever since.

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THE BACKSTORY

 

JC: Tell us a little about Mommy’s Khimar.

EG: Simply put, my wonderful agents at Bright were instrumental in helping me obtain the opportunity to illustrate Mommy’s Khimar, a picture book written by the talented Jamilah Thompkins-Bigelow.  It’s a story of a sweet, little Muslim girl who loves to wear her mother’s headscarves.

THE INSPIRATION

JC: What are some of the things that inspire you?

EG: I believe a story that can captivate the mind and transport the reader to another world, time, or place is a very inspirational feat. Be it a movie, a play, or a great book, a story that is told masterfully fuels my imagination.  I’m also inspired by the artwork of many illustrators from the past as well as our modern age.  For example, the illustrations of Bernie Fuchs, Kadir Nelson and Annette Marnat are just a few whose artwork currently inspire me; my favorites always differ.

 I also believe that Life is great source of inspiration.  Sometimes it’s the simplest events in my day that can inspire me to draw something new.

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THE PROCESS

JC: And finally, what’s your artistic process like?

EG: Like many artists, I work best alone in the comforts of my home.  I always begin my illustration process by brainstorming ideas and and getting them on paper.  Depending on the project, I may visit the library or scour the internet for research material, and if feasible, I may even travel to ensure that my illustrations are as authentic as possible.  I also find it helpful to post my artwork on a large corkboard.  This way I can track my progress and make sure that my illustrations are working well together.

Thank you, Ebony. To learn more about her, and see more of her wonderful illustrations, please visit her Website atwww.ebonyglenn.com

Follow her on Facebook and Twitter: @artsyebby